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Croeso: Ministers

We are proud to launch Llwybr Newydd: the Wales Transport Strategy 2021 that will shape our transport system in Wales over the next 20 years.

In Wales, we are literally taking a Llwybr Newydd - a new path. We have set out a new way of thinking that places people and climate change at the front and centre of our transport system.

This is something that we have to do. The climate emergency is one of the biggest defining issues of our time. If we are going to protect the lives of our children, we need to achieve net zero by 2050.

And in order to do that, we need to change the way we travel. We need fewer cars on our roads, and more people using public transport, walking or cycling. But we won’t achieve that level of change unless we take people with us, listening to users and involving people in designing a transport system that works for everyone.

Our transport system is one of the most important national assets we have. It connects people to one another, binds communities together and enables businesses to grow and expand. It’s one of the most powerful and dynamic tools for community cohesion, social justice and inclusive economic growth that we possess.

We need an accessible, sustainable and efficient transport system. This means one that is good for people and communities, good for the environment, good for the economy and places and supports a thriving Welsh language and culture.

So how do we make that happen?

Firstly, we need to bring services to people in order to reduce the need to travel. This is not about preventing travel altogether, it is about planning ahead for better physical and digital connectivity to support access to more local services, more home and remote working. If more people can walk and cycle for everyday trips, we will reduce our dependency on cars.

Secondly, we need to allow people and goods to move easily from door-to-door by accessible, sustainable and efficient  transport. To achieve this, we will need to invest in reliable, efficient and affordable transport services that people want to use, can use and do use. We also need the transport infrastructure to support those services. We will make sure our transport infrastructure is safe, accessible, well-maintained and future-proofed, to adapt  to climate change.

And where we need new transport infrastructure, we will take a new approach. We will use the sustainable transport hierarchy to give priority to meeting the demand for travel by walking, cycling and public transport ahead of private motor vehicles.

Thirdly, we need to encourage people to make the change to more sustainable transport. If we are going to meet our climate change targets, we also need people to travel differently. Which means making it easier to do the right thing. We will do this by making low-carbon sustainable transport more attractive and more affordable, and by adopting innovations that make it easier to use. 

Together, these three priorities will improve our health, tackle poverty and open our transport system to all, particularly for those without access to a car and those living in rural areas. 

The key to any strategy is how it will be delivered. A detailed five-year national transport delivery plan and regional transport plans will tailor delivery to the needs of every part of Wales. Four cross-cutting delivery pathways will help us follow through on our commitments on decarbonisation, equality, integrated journey planning and our rural offer, whilst nine mini-plans show how each mode and sector will deliver. We will also hold ourselves and partners to account by monitoring the strategy as a whole. 

Llwybr Newydd is the beginning of a journey - not an end. It sets a long-term direction and three urgent and immediate priorities. It shows where we want to go - and how we will get there.

This is not just our strategy. We want to thank the many individuals and organisations who helped us during drafting, and who have taken the time to respond to our consultation. Your feedback has challenged us, but your overall support clearly indicates we are on the right path, y llwybr cywir.

Llwybr Newydd - Wales Transport Strategy 2021 will deliver a transport system that provides a better Wales for generations to come.

Ken Skates MS Minister for Economy, Transport and North Wales.
Lee Waters MS Deputy Minister for Economy and Transport.

Introduction

Llwybr Newydd - or new path in Welsh - is our new transport strategy.

It sets out our vision for how our transport system can help us deliver our priorities for Wales, helping to put us on a pathway to creating a more prosperous, green and equal society.

Using the five ways of working set out in the 'Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015' we have extensively engaged with transport users, service providers and key partners to co-produce this new direction of travel.

As well as setting out a strategic direction we have developed nine mini-plans explaining how we will deliver them for different transport modes and sectors. Llwybr Newydd is also supported by a more detailed 'Mobility in Wales' report, the 'Transport Data and Trends' report and an 'Integrated Sustainability Appraisal'.

It will require governments, local authorities, transport providers (both commercial and third sector) and other policy areas to work together to help ensure that transport contributes to the current and future well-being of Wales; to set us on a new path.

Terms you will find in this strategy

Accessible

Transport services and infrastructure that meet the relevant policy and regulatory standards on equality, access, human rights and the Welsh language, recognising the social model of disability.

Active travel

For the purposes of this document ‘active travel’ refers to walking and cycling for everyday journeys - such as to go to work, or education or access services

Corporate joint committees (CJCs)

New local government tier which will take on regional transport planning in Wales.

Decarbonisation

The actions needed to cut greenhouse gas emissions and move towards a low-carbon economy. The Welsh Government is committed to net zero carbon emissions by 2050.

Demand-responsive travel

Shared private or semi-public transport based on passenger demand rather than a fixed timetable. Examples in Wales include Transport for Wales’ fflecsi services.

Devolution

This gives Wales the power to pass legislation and transfers some ministerial responsibilities to Wales. For transport this includes responsibility for roads and buses. Other areas such as rail and aviation are not devolved and Welsh Ministers work in collaboration with the UK Government.

Ecosystem resilience

The capacity of a whole ecosystem to respond to disturbance by resisting damage and recovering quickly.

Equality Act

Under the Equality Act 2010 it is unlawful to discriminate against someone because of a protected characteristic. The protected characteristics are age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage or civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation.

Five ways of working

The Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 sets out five ways of working that public bodies need to think about to show they have applied the sustainable development principle. The five ways of working are long-term, prevention, integration, collaboration and involvement.

Future Wales

The National Plan 2040. This sets out where we think we should try to grow and the types of development we need over the next 20 years to help us be a sustainable and prosperous society.

Heavy goods vehicles (HGVs)

The term for vehicles over 3.5 tonnes - light commercial vehicles (LCVs) are under this weight.

Highways Authorities

Have a duty to assert and protect the rights of the public to use and enjoy any highway for which they are an authority. As Highways Authority for the motorway and trunk road network in Wales, Welsh Ministers must maintain them at public expense and comply with other regulations.

Hydrogen vehicles

Use electricity produced through a chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. The electricity powers the car or charges a battery which powers the vehicle. The hydrogen fuel is stored in a high-pressure tank.

Infrastructure

Transport infrastructure includes all the things that enable transport services to operate – streets and roads, railway lines and active travel networks such as cycle-paths and footpaths. It also includes associated structures such as stations, bridges, embankments, car parks, signage, signalling, bus stops and transport interchanges and the soft estate - land and greenspace associated with transport. Ports and harbours, airports, and freight and logistics facilities are also important.

Land-use planning system

The process of regulating land for wider public benefit, including social and environmental outcomes.

Llwybr Newydd

Means ‘new path’ in Welsh. It is the title of the Wales Transport Strategy 2021.

Micro-mobility

Small lightweight vehicles driven by users personally and operating at speeds of under 25km hour. They can include electrically-powered cycles or scooters.

Mobility as a service (MAAS)

A shift away from personally-owned transportation to services that enable people to plan, book, pay for and use different types of transport.

National Transport Delivery Plan (NTDP)

After Llwybr Newydd has been published, Transport for Wales (TfW) will develop a National Transport Delivery Plan that sets out specific investment priorities.

National well-being goals

The seven national well-being goals are set out in the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015. They are: a prosperous Wales, a resilient Wales, a healthier Wales, a more equal Wales, a Wales of cohesive communities, a Wales of vibrant culture and thriving Welsh Language, and a globally responsible Wales.

National well-being indicators

There are 46 well-being indicators that demonstrate progress against the seven national well-being goals. The Welsh Government reports on these annually.

Private light vehicles (PLVs)

Include motorbikes and small cars that are efficient in terms of energy use, road space and materials.

Planning Policy Wales 11 (PPW11)

The Welsh Government’s guidance for making planning decisions. It is supplemented by Future Wales – the National Plan 2040.

Private hire vehicles (PHVs)

Vehicles such as minicabs, some school and day-care centre transport services and chauffeur services. Journeys must be pre-booked via a licensed private hire vehicle operator.

Protected characteristics

Under the Equality Act 2010 it is illegal to discriminate against people on the grounds of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex or sexual orientation. These are known as protected characteristics.

Public service vehicles (PSVs)

Vehicles that carry more than eight passengers for hire or reward.

Regional transport plans

After Llwybr Newydd is published, Corporate Joint Committees will prepareRegionalTransport Plans.

Public transport

Transport services available for public use, typically on fixed routes or schedules that charge a fixed fare. In Wales public transport includes bus and rail services.

Senedd

The democratically elected body that represents the interests of Wales and the Welsh people.

Social model of disability

This makes an important distinction between impairment and disability. It recognises that people with impairments are disabled by barriers that commonly exist in in society. These barriers include physical, attitudinal, environmental, systemic, linguistic and economic barriers which can prevent disabled people’s inclusion and participation in all walks of life.

Soft estate

The green spaces and land associated with strategic transport infrastructure – particularly the Strategic Road Network. It may include biodiversity.

Strategic Road Network (SRN)

The motorway and trunk road network in Wales.

Sustainable development principle

Under the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 public bodies must act in a manner which ensures that the needs of the present are met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Sustainable transport modes

Types of transport that contribute to decarbonisation including walking and cycling, public transport and low- or zero-emissions vehicles.

Sustainable transport hierarchy

Guides decisions about new infrastructure and gives priority to walking and cycling and public transport followed by ultra-low emissions and finally private vehicles. It is set out in Planning Policy Wales (PPW) 11.

Taxis and PHV standards

Taxis and private hire vehicles are high risk environments, so subject to statutory licensing, particularly for children and vulnerable adults. The UK Government sets and enforces statutory licensing standards.

Transport for Wales (TfW)

The body established by Welsh Government to deliver transport priorities in Wales.

Transport mode

The way that passengers or goods are transported by air, water or land. The modes include walking, cycles, vehicles including motorcycles, rail, ships (maritime), air (aviation). Increasingly people see transport journeys as involving different modes (multi-modal).

Transport sectors

Groups of organisations that provide services to move people or goods in the private, public or voluntary sector.

Ultra-low emissions vehicles

Vehicles that emit very few greenhouse gases – technically 75g/km CO2 or less. They may be electric, hydrogen or hybrid vehicles.

Ultra-low emissions zones

Areas where vehicles, including cars, motorcycles and vans, need to meet ultra-low emissions standards or they have to pay a charge to drive within the zone.

Wales and Borders Franchise

A contract to operate passenger railway services on the Wales and Borders lines, currently operated by Transport for Wales.

Wales Infrastructure Investment Plan

This sets the context for investment in infrastructure in Wales including transport infrastructure.

Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015

Legislation that aims to improve the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of Wales. It requires public bodies listed in the Act think more about the long-term, work better with people, communities and each other, prevent problems and take a more joined-up approach.

Welsh Transport Appraisal Guidance (WelTAG)

Welsh Transport Appraisal Guidance (WelTAG), a framework for assessing the impact and benefits of proposed transport interventions such as schemes to upgrade roads. It is aligned with the seven national well-being goals.

Our Duties

The starting point for Llwybr Newydd has been our wider duties as Welsh Government.

Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015

The Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 sets a legally-binding common purpose for national government. It defines seven well-being goals and five ways of working to help public services meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The act supports our existing commitments such as those on the Welsh language, equalities and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Decarbonisation

Welsh Government has committed to introduce legislation to achieve a net zero 2050 target, in line with recommendations from the UK Climate Change Committee. To achieve this, we will need to meet a 63% reduction by 2030 and an 89% reduction by 2040. We have agreed to front-load action in the next 15 years to avoid the cumulative emissions which later action would incur, and to send a strong signal about the need to take action today rather than leaving the hard work for others tomorrow.

Our duties as a Highway Authority

The network of roads and streets in Wales is a shared resource, used predominantly by cars, but also by bus and community transport, freight and goods vehicles. It also supports walking and cycling. Welsh Ministers have a statutory duty to maintain the strategic road network under the Highways Act 1980. This includes motorways and most of the A roads in Wales - local authorities maintain and keep safe other roads, including some A roads, local streets and rural lanes.

Equality

The Equality Act 2010 sets out the public sector equality duty, which covers discrimination because of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation (protected characteristics). The Welsh Government’s Strategic Equality Plan shows how we will address the public sector equality duty and complements our wider duties, including those relating to young people. There are separate policy and legislative processes for ensuring the right to receive public services in the official languages of Wales, which are being taken forward through the Welsh Language (Wales) Measure 2011. Together the equality and Welsh language policy agendas complement and inform one another.

In relation to transport, our equality duties include issues such as the right to travel, the right to information in an accessible form, the requirement that disabled people should not be treated less favourably and the need to make reasonable adjustments.

There are also specific licensing and regulatory requirements around different transport modes that include provisions on equality and accessibility.

The transport strategy

The Transport (Wales) Act 2006 places a duty on Welsh Ministers to prepare and publish a strategy setting out its policies and how they will be discharged. Covering all modes, it sets out our strategic priorities and desired outcomes, providing a link to the wider priorities as well as plans at the local authority level. The same Act requires Welsh Ministers to keep the strategy under review and provides the ability to revise it from time to time.

Devolution

Devolution gives Wales the power to pass legislation and transfers some ministerial responsibilities to Wales. For transport this includes responsibility for roads and buses. Other areas such as rail, ports, and aviation are not devolved and remain the responsibility of the Secretary of State for Transport in the UK Government. Under the Wales Act 2017 additional transport powers were given to Welsh Ministers including in relation to taxis and PHVs.

01. Vision

An accessible, sustainable and efficient transport system.

‘Accessible’ means a system that meets the relevant policy and regulatory standards on equality, access, human rights and the Welsh language, and aims to remove the physical,  attitudinal, environmental, systemic, linguistic and economic barriers that prevent people from using sustainable transport services and infrastructure.

‘Sustainable’ means a transport system that meets the needs of the present generation whilst protecting the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

‘Efficient’ means a transport system that gets people where they want to go, when they want to go there, making best use of resources.

‘Transport system’ means transport infrastructure (such as footpaths, cycle paths, roads and rail as well as the many other structures and systems that support them including digital infrastructure) and transport services (such as bus and rail, taxis, aviation and maritime transport). The wider system encompasses commercial and third sector transport providers. It also includes governance - the legislation, regulation, and policies that govern transport.

02. Our priorities

These are our three headline priorities for the next five years. There is more detail about these priorities in the mini-plans. We will review these priorities as circumstances and technology change.

Priority 1: Bring services to people in order to reduce the need to travel

We will plan ahead for better physical and digital connectivity, more local services, more home and remote working and more active travel, to reduce the need for people to use their cars on a daily basis.

We will:

  • support remote working so people can work from an office near their home one or more days a week instead of commuting long distances, in line with our wider Welsh Government target of 30% of the workforce to work remotely on a regular basis
  • locate new public services such as education, health and leisure facilities close to where people live, and to existing public transport routes, adopting a Town Centre First approach
  • build new workplaces and homes close to public transport and design new developments to be walk- and cycle-friendly from the outset
  • ensure a joined-up approach to infrastructure investment decisions across Welsh Government and in regional planning
  • maximise the use of land close to transport hubs including railway stations and ports, as sites for investment and growth
  • improve access to fast and reliable broadband both at home and for businesses
  • set aside land for multi-modal hubs to transfer long haul freight to smaller vans or e-cargo bikes for last-mile deliveries, so that deliveries in urban areas are more efficient and cause less congestion.

Priority 2: Allow people and goods to move easily from door to door by accessible, sustainable and efficient transport services and infrastructure

We will actively aim to achieve a shift away from private car use to more sustainable transport modes for the majority of journeys. We will invest in low-carbon, accessible, efficient and sustainable transport services and infrastructure that enable more people to walk, cycle and use public transport, and low-emissions vehicles.

Services

We will provide reliable, efficient, effective and affordable transport services that people want to use, can use and do use. We will:

  • improve the reliability, safety, and frequency of public transport services, setting standards for what communities can expect and working towards those over time
  • extend the geographical ‘reach’ of public transport into every community, especially in rural Wales 
  • make it easier to switch between different types of transport including public transport, active travel, taxis and options such as community transport so people can be more confident about leaving the car behind
  • ensure that public transport services comply with our legal and policy requirements on accessibility, including ensuring services are physically accessible to wheelchair users, and that drivers and staff ensure that everyone feels welcome and safe
  • make fares, tickets and timetables as simple as possible, and make sure information is easily available and accessible to everyone
  • involve public transport users in the design of new services
  • review our mandatory and voluntary concessionary fares schemes to encourage shift to public transport from cars.

Infrastructure

We will provide safe, accessible, well-maintained and managed transport infrastructure. We will also future-proof it to adapt to climate change and facilitate more sustainable transport choices. Where we need new transport infrastructure, we will use the Sustainable Transport Hierarchy to guide decisions.

We will:

  • continue to make best use of existing transport infrastructure by maintaining it and managing it effectively and efficiently
  • adapt existing infrastructure to climate change by addressing issues such as flooding
  • upgrade our existing infrastructure to meet our legal obligations on accessibility and safety and to address issues such as congestion, and changes to vehicle standards
  • adapt our infrastructure to support modal shift
  • where we need new transport infrastructure, we will use the Sustainable Transport Hierarchy to give priority to interventions that support walking and cycling, public transport and ultra-low emissions vehicles over other private motor vehicles
  • use inclusive design principles in infrastructure projects to improve accessibility and safety for everyone
  • support digital and other innovations that improve asset management and maintenance and reduce congestion
  • explore future infrastructure improvements that reduce carbon emissions, including infrastructure for new fuels such as hydrogen, technology that facilitates more sustainable aviation and cargo operations, and materials innovation that improves service life, speed of construction and maintenance and reduces environmental impacts.

Priority 3: Encourage people to make the change to more sustainable transport

We will encourage people to change their travel behaviour to use low-carbon, sustainable transport. We will do this by making sustainable transport more attractive and more affordable, and by adopting innovations that make it easier to use.

We will:

  • develop a range of behaviour change projects to encourage people to make smarter travel choices to reduce congestion and increase use of sustainable modes of transport
  • transform the customer experience of public transport including reliability, punctuality and training for staff and drivers, so people are more confident about using services
  • move away from individual vehicle ownership to shared solutions, including car-sharing, car clubs, bike sharing and mobility as a service
  • develop a framework for fair and equitable road-user charging in Wales and explore other disincentives to car use, taking into account equality issues including needs of people in rural areas, people who share protected characteristics and people on low incomes
  • use new revenue sources to fund large improvements in public transport services and active travel facilities
  • reduce the cost of sustainable travel through initiatives such as scrappage schemes for older vehicles, grants towards the cost of electric bikes, and by extending concessionary travel schemes to those who most need it
  • support digital innovation and look at options for a transport ‘open data’ store, to improve journey planning and booking, develop integrated ticketing, and improve real-time information for passengers 
  • get buy-in at a local level by engaging with communities to design transport interventions that meet local needs and circumstances
  • use education, campaigning, marketing and other tools to transform the image of walking, cycling and public transport.

03. Well-being ambitions

Our short-term priorities are designed to contribute to our four long-term, well-being ambitions over the next twenty years. These ambitions show how we want transport to contribute to our wider Welsh Government ambitions and to the goals in the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015. 

Good for people and communities

A transport system that contributes to a more equal Wales and to a healthier Wales, that everyone has the confidence to use. 

Equality

We will make transport services and infrastructure accessible and inclusive by aiming to remove the physical, attitudinal, environmental, systemic, linguistic and economic barriers that prevent people from using sustainable transport

We will aim to remove the physical, attitudinal, environmental, systemic, linguistic and economic barriers that prevent people from using sustainable transport, including walking, cycling and public transport.

We will remove these barriers through meeting our legal, regulatory and policy requirements on accessibility, through adopting best practice on inclusive design and through training and service standards, in line with our equality, language and human rights duties, our six Accessible and Inclusive Public Transport Objectives and the priorities set out in Action on Disability - our framework for independent living. 

Health

We will improve air quality and reduce environmental noise associated with transport.

Air pollution, including CO2, NO2 and particulate matter, is one of our biggest health challenges, shortening life spans and damaging the quality of life for many. We will improve air quality by pursuing modal shift, encouraging more active travel, greater use of public transport and ultra-low emissions vehicles, and by creating closer links between land-use planning and transport in line with our commitments in the Clean Air Plan for Wales: Healthy Air, Healthy Wales. 

Traffic noise can affect quality of life and contribute to poorer health outcomes from hearing loss to cardio-vascular disease. We will reduce decibels and increase healthier soundscapes, keep noise to an acceptable level in the design of new developments, adopt noise mitigation on motorways and quieter vehicle travel, and grow active travel in line with the actions in our Noise and Soundscape Action Plan.

We will also work with colleagues in the health sectors to better integrate planning for health and transport. 

We will contribute to higher activity levels through more people walking and cycling. 

For adults, achieving the recommended amount of 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a week helps prevent and manage over 20 chronic conditions such as coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and cancer, and can have a significant positive impact on people’s well-being. Walking and cycling can contribute directly to activity levels. 

We will make healthy transport options more attractive, affordable, prominent and accessible by investing more in cycling and walking, integrated transport, accessible transport hubs and public transport. We will use Health Impact Assessments, social welfare cost models and other planning tools to ensure health is taken into account in transport planning in line with our commitments in 'Healthy Weight, A Healthy Wales'. 

Confidence and safety

We want everyone to feel confident, safe, secure and welcome using the sustainable transport mode of their choice. 

In order to boost confidence, we will improve the way people receive information so people can plan journeys with confidence. We will use digital approaches that identify the needs of transport users to develop systems that work for all. We will improve confidence by addressing personal safety on public transport, in active travel and on the roads for all road users. We will integrate safety considerations into all aspects of transport policy and planning, including the inclusive design of infrastructure. We also recognise the importance of transport in addressing the ambitions in Connected Communities – our strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation, and building stronger social connections and Ageing Well which includes transport as one of the 8 pillars of an age-friendly community.

Good for the environment

A transport system that delivers a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, maintains biodiversity, and enhances ecosystem resilience and reduces waste. 

Greenhouse gas emissions

We will deliver a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from transport.

The Welsh Government is committed to net zero-emissions by 2050. In 2018 transport was responsible for 17% of Welsh greenhouse gas emissions – 62% from private car use, 19% from Light Goods Vehicles and 16% from bus and Heavy Goods Vehicles. The UK Climate Change Committee has proposed a carbon reduction pathway for surface transport that means that emissions need to be roughly halved between 2020 and 2030. 

We will deliver a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from transport by reducing demand, supporting low-carbon services and infrastructure and through modal shift in line with the UK Climate Change Committee recommendations, our commitments on net zero, and our five-yearly Wales Carbon Budgets. 

Biodiversity and ecosystem resilience

We will maintain and enhance biodiversity,and increase ecosystem resilience through transport operations and infrastructure projects.

In line with our Natural Resources Policy, we will maintain biodiversity and increase ecosystems resilience through the way we, and our partners, manage the soft estate associated with transport networks and in the design and delivery of transport interventions including upgrading infrastructure and new infrastructure schemes. We will also ensure that day-to-day transport operations maintain and enhance biodiversity and ecosystem resilience. 

Waste

We will make better use of existing infrastructure in order to reduce waste associated with transport.
Making best use of existing transport infrastructure will also avoid the need for new infrastructure and so help meet our ambitions to produce roughly 65% of the waste we produce, as set out in Towards Zero Waste. 

Good for the economy and places in Wales

A transport system that contributes to our wider economic ambitions, and helps local communities, supports a more sustainable supply chain, uses the latest innovations and addresses transport affordability. 

Cohesive communities

We want a transport system that helps local communities by meeting the needs of different parts of Wales, including rural areas.

In line with our commitments in Future Wales – the National Plan 2040 we will use the Sustainable Transport Hierarchy when planning new developments, and will use RegionalTransport Plans to ensure that planning and transport solutions are tailored to the needs of different communities and different parts of Wales, including rural Wales. We will also consider the wider urban and built environment in new transport infrastructure development including the public realm, open spaces and green streets. 

Innovation

We will support operational, technological and digital innovations that enable and encourage more people to use sustainable transport.

We will support operational innovations which mean people won’t always need to own a car. These include demand-responsive transport, car-sharing, the idea of ‘mobility as a service’ and sharing opportunities for freight and other transport. We want Wales to be a centre for innovative technology such as hydrogen, electric and hybrid technology design and production that reduces carbon emissions from transport. We will also look ahead to new forms of micro-mobility, drone and other technology that is transforming freight and logistics. We will embrace digital innovations that help us coordinate services, users to better plan journeys, and operators to manage their fleets and infrastructure.

The distribution of goods

We will work with businesses and the UK Government to create a more sustainable system of distributing goods in Wales.

We will encourage more freight to be moved by rail and plan for the future of the Welsh supply chain through logistics hubs, innovations and shared transport solutions in line with our priorities in the Wales Marine Plan and our planning priorities in Future Wales. We will also work with the sectors on solutions to address the impacts of a huge growth in last-mile deliveries. 

Affordability  

We will make sustainable transport options more affordable.

In line with our duties to consider socio-economic deprivation, we will take affordability into account in planning new transport interventions. We will look at making public transport more affordable for more people. We will recognise the fact that some people – particular those who live in rural areas – may have fewer transport choices for low-cost independent mobility so we may need provide alternatives such as shared car schemes  or other options that meet the particular needs of those communities. 

Good for culture and the Welsh language

A transport system that supports the Welsh language, enables more people to use sustainable transport to get to arts, sport and cultural activities, and protects and enhances the historic environment. 

The Welsh language

We will help the Welsh language to thrive.

The Welsh Language (Wales) Measure 2011 sets current standards that we and other public bodies must follow, although these may change through time. In addition, we will also help create an environment in which the Welsh language can thrive in line with Cymraeg 2050 by encouraging commercial and third sector operators to increase the use of Welsh on services and in the workplace, in transport information and digital services. We will also aim for equality of provision in transport access to Welsh-language education.

Arts, sport and culture

More people can enjoy arts, sports, and natural and cultural heritage in Wales using sustainable transport.

We will join up planning for transport and major events in Wales and work with Visit Wales to promote transport heritage attractions in Wales, including historic railways, canals and other initiatives in line with Welcome to Wales – our  priorities for the visitor economy, and our priorities for arts, sport and culture. 

Historic environment

We will protect and enhance Wales’ historic environment in transport interventions.

We will protect and enhance the historic environment in transport asset management and operations, and ensure that that historic assets are identified, protected and enhanced in transport interventions, planning and decision-making, in line with our statutory planning policies and our Priorities for the Historic Environment.

04. How we will deliver

This is how we will deliver the commitments in Llwybr Newydd. 

4.1 Investing responsibly

We will give priority to funding projects and programmes that meet the ambitions and priorities in Llwybr Newydd. 

We will continue to make best use of existing transport infrastructure by maintaining and managing it well. We will invest in improving road safety, addressing congestion and also adapt transport infrastructure to a changing climate and upgrade it to support modal shift.

Where we need new infrastructure, we will use the Sustainable Transport Hierarchy. This will give priority to interventions that support active travel, public transport and ultra-low emissions vehicles over other private motor vehicles. 

In the longer term, supporting modal shift on a substantial scale will require a large capital investment and ongoing revenue support beyond the current level. We will ensure that the more specific capital transport expenditure on projects and programmes that support Llwybr Newydd is aligned with the Wales Infrastructure Investment Plan.

Maintenance and management 

In order to make the best use of existing infrastructure, we will adopt more rigorous asset management planning so that minor issues are dealt with before they require major capital investment. Because the maintenance of transport assets can have a critical impact on transport services such as rail and bus, and on road congestion and delays, we also need to work collaboratively to plan and manage the timing of asset management. The overall aim is to reduce the maintenance backlog and make better use of our existing infrastructure - looking for opportunities to reallocate road space to sustainable modes as we do so. We will also design new infrastructure interventions with maintenance in mind - taking account of the whole lifecycle.

Transport grant schemes and procurement 

We will review our transport grant schemes and our approach to procurement, to ensure they meet the ambitions and priorities in Llwybr Newydd. We will also work across government to ensure that transport investments are connected to wider government investment priorities, for example by focusing economic investment around pre-existing transport hubs and gateways, and linking to other areas such as the visitor economy.

Where relevant, we will also link our funding decisions and procurement to service quality standards and to issues such as fair work.

Inclusive design

We will comply with the relevant regulations, policies and standards on transport and accessibility. We will also use inclusive design principles to ensure that services and infrastructure are designed for everyone. We will also ask project designers to engage with people who have direct experience of access issues.

Enhance the use and application of the Welsh Transport Appraisal Guidance (WelTAG)

All new projects will be supported by WelTAG appraisals, which will be in place before final approvals are given. WelTAG is the appraisal guidance that we use to decide whether new projects should go ahead. We will keep WelTAG under review to ensure that it is aligned with the national well-being goals and working effectively, and support training for the public, private and third sectors in using WelTAG to make sure it is being used as intended. We will also monitor complete projects to ensure that they have delivered the wider benefits outlined in the WelTAG appraisal.

4.2 Delivery and action plans

We will work with partners on the following delivery plans to turn this strategy into action.

National Transport Delivery Plan (NTDP)

Transport for Wales will develop a detailed five-year National Transport Delivery Plan (NTDP), setting out the specific transport interventions financed by the Welsh Government. The plan will identify expenditure, based on the priorities in Llwybr Newydd, including the delivery of projects that are already underway. The NTDP will support the implementation of Future Wales – the National Plan 2040 and be aligned with the Wales Infrastructure Investment Plan, and will be reviewed every five years. The NTDP will need to take into account both the movement of people and goods. 

Statement of Funds Available (SoFA)

The NTDP will be based on a Statement of Funds Available (SoFA) in the light of the next UK Comprehensive Spending Review. This will provide more certainty over the funding available in the delivery plan period. The SoFA will identify what can be spent on transport services, maintenance and projects, although due to our own annual budget settlement, an absolute five-year commitment for revenue and capital is unachievable. It will provide high, medium and low budget scenarios allowing Transport for Wales to plan and respond effectively to changing circumstances, taking into account existing commitments. 

Regional Transport Plans

Regional Corporate Joint Committees will also prepare Regional Transport Plans for transport in their area. These will be shaped by Llwybr Newydd and aligned with Future Wales – the National Plan 2040 and the emerging regional development plans. Regional Transport Plans will include both policy and the supporting regional transport delivery plan. 

South East Wales Transport Commission (SEWTC) 

South East Wales Transport Commission (SEWTC), chaired by Lord Burns, has been looking at solutions to congestion on the M4 in south east Wales. The findings from the Burns commission are aligned with Llwybr Newydd and the interventions proposed will be included in the 'National transport delivery plan' and in 'Regional transport plans'. 

4.3 Cross-cutting delivery pathways

We have identified four key areas that are critical to Llwybr Newydd – decarbonisation, equality, integrated journey planning and the rural offer. These cut across different modes and sectors. There are a wide range of commitments on each of these throughout Llwybr Newydd. 

We will develop four delivery pathways. Each pathway will list the specific commitments in Llwybr Newydd and map out what needs to be done to make them happen. We will then set up a working group to oversee delivery, reporting regularly to the Transport Performance Board (see below). 

Decarbonisation pathway: this will set out how we move from policy into delivery to reduce greenhouse gases from transport in line with Wales’ carbon budgets and the target for net zero by 2050. 

Equality pathway: this will map our specific legal and policy commitments on the accessibility of infrastructure and services, as well as our commitments on inclusive design, training,  policy development and standards, and report back to the Transport Performance Board on delivery. The aim is to ensure that equality is integrated into transport planning at the highest level rather than seen as a separate issue. In line with the five ways of working, we will involve people with direct experience of equality issues including the Transport for Wales Advisory Panel. 

Integrated journey planning pathway: modal shift requires a holistic, integrated approach to journey planning, working across different modes and sectors to make it easier for people to travel door-to-door using sustainable transport modes. An integrated journey planning pathway will involve a complex range of issues such as timetabling, information provision, infrastructure planning and policy development. Again, a dedicated group will co-ordinate this – working in partnership and reporting back to the Transport Performance Board.

Rural pathway: there are significant disparities between rural transport services in Wales and what is on offer in more urban areas. Our rural pathway will monitor progress on the rural commitments in Llwybr Newydd and our rural offer, working closely with regional Corporate Joint Committees, other Welsh Government policy areas and across each of the transport modes and sectors, reporting back to the Transport Performance Board.

4.4 Working in partnership

We need to work in partnership to deliver Llwybr Newydd. 

We will work effectively with the UK Government on shared responsibilities, pressing for a Welsh voice in critical decisions that affect Wales. Through a mixture of reserved and devolved powers, we share transport responsibilities in Wales with the UK government, who play a critical role in rail operations and investment, in aviation and ports and in regulation. Other UK-wide policies including decarbonisation and exit from the European Union also shape our approach to, and policy on, transport. We will work with the Department for Transport and the Secretary of State for Wales’ Office to raise awareness of devolved issues and to deliver joint objectives.

We will also work with the Commissioners in Wales and the National Infrastructure Commission to align the delivery of Llwybr Newydd with wider Welsh Government priorities on equality and infrastructure.

In relation to safety, we will strengthen relationships between the Traffic Commissioner, Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency and Welsh Government to improve safety across the sectors.

In accordance with the five ways of working, we will work across Welsh Government with education, planning, health and other policy areas to integrate transport considerations into wider decision-making, feeding into policy development, and learning from both successes and failures.

We recognise the vital role that local authorities in Wales play in transport. We will support local authorities in planning for, and delivering, transport services and networks in their local areas, including improving bus services, supporting active travel, COVID-19 recovery and community transport initiatives.

Linked to this, we will implement effective regional transport planning and delivery through Corporate Joint Committees (CJCs), who will be empowered (and supported) to plan for services at a regional level, aligned with other regional and local planning priorities.

In future we will expand the role of TfW, the delivery partner for Welsh Government, building on their initial role in  managing and delivering the Wales and Borders Franchise in Wales to explore opportunities to play a role in delivering an integrated transport system for people in Wales.

We will involve transport users in developing high level policy and on taking this strategy forward, working with a range of user groups including people who share protected characteristics. We will also gather better use data on travel behaviours, and make it easier to gather real-time feedback from all users.

Finally, we will strengthen our engagement with commercial and third sector transport operators in Wales to help businesses thrive, in conjunction with other areas of Welsh Government including Business Wales.

4.5 Updating our policies and governance

We will update our existing guidance and policy documents to reflect the ambitions and priorities in Llwybr Newydd. 

These will include updating TAN (Technical Advice Note) 18: Transport as well as our guidance on biodiversity, our trunk road maintenance standards and our Road Safety Framework. We will also review our approach to local speed limits.

We will also take forward some of our wider reforms designed to improve transport services in Wales, including proposals to reform bus services and taxi and private hire vehicle services, practical measures to improve active travel such as pavement parking and speed limits, and proposals for the further devolution of transport powers in Wales.

We will explore other governance improvements such as a Memorandum of Understanding between Welsh Ministers and the Traffic Commissioners and develop a Memorandum of Understanding between Welsh Government, Transport for Wales and the Community Transport Association. 

In our regulatory and governance reforms we will maintain our commitment to fair work and a focus on our wider well-being ambitions. 

4.6 Skills and capacity

In order to deliver Llwybr Newydd we will need to build capacity and skills within Welsh Government, in partners including local authorities and in delivery organisations. There are major challenges around delivering innovation in transport and how best to facilitate those, including digital innovation. Taking forward decarbonisation will involve legal, economic, technical, social challenges, whilst demand management and delivering a more inclusive approach to transport across Wales, particularly in rural areas, also requires new thinking.

05. Holding ourselves and our partners to account

We will report on our progress against Llwybr Newydd. We will also review the priorities in Llwybr Newydd and the mini-plans every five years to reflect changing circumstances and respond to major policy challenges. Given the pandemic and the uncertainty of how this will affect travel patterns in the long-term, we will need to keep our targets and measures under review. 

5.1 Transport Performance Board

We will set up a Transport Performance Board to review our overall progress on Llwybr Newydd and will involve stakeholders including users, the commercial and third sectors, local authorities and equality groups to support the Board’s work. 

The Board will also monitor the supporting plans including the National Transport Delivery Plan and Regional Transport Plans. The Board will review the work of Transport for Wales and other partners in Wales including the Department for Transport and Network Rail. 

5.2 A new evaluation framework

In order to report on Llwybr Newydd, we will need to complement the existing Wales Transport Statistics with the capacity to create a new evaluation framework to track progress against achieving our ambitions and priorities, as well as the commitments in the mini-plans set out in this strategy. The evaluation framework will need to be designed to measure performance and report annually, in order to inform decision making from a strong evidence base. 
 
It will need to include a number of quantitative measures covering all modes of transport. The measures will draw on multiple sources of data, including both established datasets and new data collection and research initiatives. The measures will be underpinned by a range of supporting metrics that will give a broader picture of each and allow further breakdown by mode, demographic, socioeconomic and geographic factors, where possible. 

We will also need to make use of information collected through other Welsh Government initiatives, such as a new National Travel Survey, and analyse published datasets such as traffic flows and bus timetables. We will also need to understand how and why people make transport choices. Rather than assume we know what people want, we and our partners will use surveys and direct engagement through the National Travel Survey to understand the choices people make and the factors that influence them. We have developed regional transport models covering the whole of Wales which will further strengthen and enhance our current evidence base.

5.3 Modal shift

Modal shift is at the heart of Llwybr Newydd. This means the proportion of trips made by sustainable modes increases and fewer trips are made by private cars. 

The Climate Change Committee has proposed a carbon reduction pathway for Wales that means emissions from surface transport must be roughly halved between 2020 and 2030 from 6 to 3 million tonnes CO2. Whilst electric vehicles may provide the biggest emissions savings, this is unlikely to be the main source of savings until the late 2020s and possibly later. Therefore, we need to look at other measures. 

Carbon savings from more people working remotely will help, and Wales has set a target of 30% of the workforce to work remotely on a regular basis. Our priority on reducing demand will help achieve this.

However, we also need to achieve mode shift with more people using public transport, walking and cycling. Based on our current analysis, we have set a target of 45% of journeys to be made by public transport, walking and cycling – by 2040. This represents an increase of 13 percentage points on the estimated current mode share of 32%. We have also committed to keeping this under review if justified by the evidence. We will need to include measures within our evaluation framework to track progress against this target and make sure that in achieving this target we do not have a negative differential impact on people who share protected characteristics and who rely on public transport.

These estimates are based on English National Travel Survey, disaggregated by rural-urban category and weighted to match the proportion of people living in each rural-urban category in Wales.

5.4 Well-being measures

We will also gather existing data and data from the new National Travel Survey and other sources including data on the impact of our funding, to report against our well-being ambitions.

Good for people and communities 

This would include measures related to equality so we can better understand how different groups with protected characteristics experience travel and their satisfaction levels. 

In relation to health, we will continue to measure air quality and environmental noise attributable to transport. For safety, we will consider monitoring how safe people feel using different types of public transport, and also walking and cycling. This would complement the data that we already collect on accidents, vehicle enforcement checks and compliance with speed limits.

Good for the environment 

We will continue to assess CO2 and other emissions from different modes of transport, as well as tonnes of carbon generated per person per kilometre travelled by different modes. We will need to also consider the impact of transport on biodiversity, ecosystem resilience and waste. We may also need to look more closely at milestones for distance travelled. 

Good for the economy and places in Wales 

This will include consideration of the extent to which people can access work, leisure, education and services by sustainable transport modes, as well as issues such as affordability and the causes of congestion. 

To understand how well we are managing and maintaining infrastructure, we need data on the condition of transport infrastructure including the number and severity of defects and the associated maintenance backlog. The average age and fuel efficiency of service vehicles including the bus fleet, taxi and private hire vehicle fleets and rolling stock is also relevant.

In future it would be useful to better understand the transport workforce in Wales, although this is difficult to define, given that it also could include logistics, and parts of the visitor economy. For the supply chain we need to better understand progress on the transition to low or zero-emission vehicles and gain a better understanding of data around freight and logistics in general.

Good for culture and the Welsh language 

We will need data on the contribution of transport to culture and the Welsh language, and better information on the protection of heritage assets and their settings in asset management and transport interventions.

5.5 Data on modes and sectors

We will also need to continue to gather data on each of the modes and sectors and develop new measures to ensure that we are progressing on our wider commitments. 

For example, we will need to track the growth of active travel as part of our modal share target. We will also need more research to understand barriers to active travel for people who do not currently walk or cycle for everyday journeys, including people who share protected characteristics.

For bus and rail, we will continue to gather more specific data on punctuality, use, reliability, safety and service provision as well as barriers to use. We will also need to track our progress towards lower emissions buses and licensed vehicles, and decarbonising rail traction.

For roads we will continue to gather data on road safety, journey reliability, traffic volumes, vehicle class and fuel type as well as the long-term measurement of the performance indicators set up in the 20 mph pilot studies. In future we will need better data on cycle use and to better understand pedestrian movements and behaviours. We will also need to understand the carbon impact of operating, maintaining and improving the road network, and progress on reducing the maintenance backlog to sustainable levels. 

Importantly, we will need to understand the direct and indirect impacts of our investments against all modes.

06. The five ways of working

In order to achieve all of this we need to think and work differently. We will do this by using the five ways of working, set out in the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015.

6.1 Involvement 

We will involve people in the design and delivery of transport services. This is critical to our ambition to overcome the barriers that prevent people from making best use of sustainable transport. We will ask people who share protected characteristics and also Welsh speakers to advise on policies and programmes as they are developed, implemented and evaluated. We also need to engage with people who don’t use sustainable transport now, in order to better understand the barriers they face, and how best to encourage them to use sustainable transport. 

6.2 Collaboration 

Chapter Four shows how we will work in partnership with the UK Government, with the Commissioners in Wales and the National Infrastructure Commission, with Welsh Local Authorities and the new Corporate Joint Committees, with Transport for Wales and with transport providers to deliver the commitments in Llwybr Newydd. 

We will also collaborate with other policy areas including planning, the economy, health, equality, decarbonisation, the environment, culture and Welsh language in order to align our approach to transport with wider goals, and to ensure that we are not working in isolation.

6.3 Prevention 

Llwybr Newydd aims to prevent problems occurring or getting worse. This includes problems associated with equality, health and climate change. Our four well-being ambitions show how we will address major long-term challenges for society, including equality and health, the environment, the economy and places, and culture and Welsh language. We will take action to address those problems through the five-year priorities as well as by measuring progress, through our delivery plans and the mini-plans for each mode and sector.

6.4 Integration 

We will take an integrated approach to strategic transport policies and programming, making sure that we consider each of the seven national well-being goals. For example, we will make sure that our policies on decarbonisation also address issues such as equality and health. We will also use WelTAG to make sure that individual transport investment decisions take well-being goals into account. We will also recognise the importance of integration between transport modes, through our Integrated Journey Planning Pathway. 

6.5 Long-term 

Llwybr Newydd takes a long-term approach by setting 20-year well-being ambitions and by exploring targets and measures that will help track our contribution to those. We also recognise that taking a long-term view may involve flexing our policies and approaches in order to meet those ambitions. Therefore, we have set five-year priorities which we will keep under review. We need to act now to build on the opportunity created by COVID-19 to think differently about how we work and where we work. It has also shown us that however well we plan for the future, events can and will throw us off course.

07. Mini-plans

These mini-plans show how individual transport sectors and modes will deliver the priorities in Llwybr Newydd. They do not replace the need for more comprehensive sector and modal strategies, particularly in fast-changing areas such as aviation, logistics and freight.

Integrated approach to transport

Although we have set out individual mini-plans, we will continue to take an integrated approach to transport through our four pathways:

  • decarbonisation
  • equality
  • integrated journey planning, and 
  • rural transport. 

These pathways will make sure that we work across all transport modes and sectors on key issues to deliver wider commitments. 

Regional Transport Plans and the National Transport Delivery Plan will also cover more than one mode or sector.

7.1 Active travel

Our vision

In line with the Active Travel (Wales) Act we want walking and cycling to become the normal choice for shorter journeys, because active travel is better for our health, our environment and the economy 

Priorities

Over the next five years we will with partners:

  • continuously develop a network of local routes for walking and cycling to connect people with the places they travel to for everyday journeys
  • refresh the plans for Integrated Active Travel Networks every three years, based on extensive consultation with a particular emphasis on people who do not currently walk or cycle for local trips
  • include education facilities on Network Maps, including Welsh-medium education
  • train and develop professionals in best practice active travel design and guidance to ensure high quality infrastructure is put in place 
  • develop a package of ‘soft’ behaviour change measures, such as aiming to make cycle training available for all and travel planning, to complement ‘hard’ infrastructure investment.
  • put in place a policy framework that ensures that all new developments, including new school and health facilities, make provision for walking and cycling from the outset
  • encourage all schools to have an active travel plan and adopt actions to slow traffic and widen pavements around schools
  • change the default speed limit from 30mph to 20mph in built-up areas to reduce traffic related injuries and fatalities and make walking and cycling safer and more attractive
  • support safer, better cycle paths and more space for walking and cycling through closing roads for vehicle traffic, more facilities for pedestrians, and support for cycle training and safety schemes for all road users
  • introduce pilot schemes to make use of electrically assisted bikes (e-bikes) and e-cargo bikes an affordable option for more individuals and businesses
  • work with partners on behaviour-change programmes to encourage uptake of healthy and active travel through for example, workplace schemes, including provision of facilities such as cycle parking 
  • work with UK partners on a regulatory framework for micro-mobility modes such as e-scooters
  • manage and evaluate the Active Travel Fund which supports local authorities to develop and deliver active travel schemes, including best-practice sharing and regional collaboration 
  • work towards ‘Safe Cycling from Village to Town’ giving villages safe cycling access to the nearest town and creating hub-and-spoke active travel corridors connecting market towns and other significant local centres to surrounding villages and outlying developments

Well-being ambitions

By 2040 active travel will have delivered significant well-being benefits because:

People and communities
  • active travel is more inclusive
  • overall activity levels have increased because more people are walking and cycling
  • walking and cycling is safer for everyone
The environment
  • there are fewer greenhouse gas emissions and air quality has improved because more people have replaced car journeys with active travel 
  • biodiversity is maintained and ecosystems are more resilient on existing active travel networks and in the design of new active travel infrastructure
  • active travel networks are well maintained and managed, and upgraded to adapt to climate change 
Places and the economy
  • more people use active travel to get to work 
  • innovations have encouraged the uptake of active travel including e-bike and e-cargo bike schemes 
  • there is a thriving active travel economy 
  • the National Cycle Network is in good condition and supports the visitor economy
Culture and the Welsh language
  • former railway lines and other redundant transport infrastructure are safeguarded for the future or for re-use or as cycle paths, footpaths or footways 
  • more people can use walking and cycling to enjoy Wales’ historic sites and monuments, national parks and landscapes and coastal areas 

Five ways of working 

We will:

  • involve people in the design of new active travel networks and help local authorities reach those who currently do not travel actively
  • ensure active travel policies and the design of new active travel infrastructure take equality into account  
  • replace car journeys with active travel to prevent climate change as part of our wider targets for modal share
  • collaborate with colleagues in planning, built environment, health, environment and education sectors to increase levels of active travel
  • monitor and review our priorities as well as the contribution of active travel to Llwybr Newydd as a whole.

7.2 Bus 

Our vision

A stable and coherent network of bus services that are fully integrated with other modes of public transport, that are reliable, affordable, flexible, easy to use, low-carbon and that encourage more people to use the bus rather than their cars. 

Priorities

Over the next five years we will:

  • support quality, affordable, regular, reliable and punctual bus services in partnership with local authorities, the commercial and third sectors
  • address congestion hotspots and invest in bus stations and stops to speed up journeys and improve passenger experiences
  • extend the reach of bus services in Wales
  • set standards so passengers know what they can expect from bus services in Wales
  • work with partners to ensure that services and infrastructure are physically accessible to wheelchair users
  • continue to improve bus services for education including Welsh-medium education
  • keep drivers and passengers safe by ensuring access to contactless payment technology, screens and other measures required to maintain public health
  • manage post-COVID-19 adaptations to bus services to reflect the changing needs of the travelling public
  • deliver innovative, more flexible bus services, in partnership with local authorities, the commercial and third sectors
  • roll out the technology and infrastructure to deliver ultra-low emissions buses 
  • progress our new bus legislation that gives the public sector more control over local bus services 
  • improve working conditions and attractiveness of the industry to bus drivers
  • ensure there is training in place to ensure that drivers make everybody feel welcome and safe, and keep that training up to date
  • support the Traffic Commissioner in implementing an effective enforcement regime that helps to improve reliability and journey times for passengers
  • prepare Welsh language standards for those who provide bus services in Wales
  • work with bus providers to help deliver these priorities and to attract bus group company investment in their Welsh services, with longer-term funding horizons.

Well-being ambitions

By 2040 we will deliver significant well-being benefits through bus services because:

People and communities
  • a faster, more reliable network of bus routes and services means people will not miss out on access to health, education, job opportunities and social contact simply because of where they to live 
  • bus services and facilities are accessible, attractive and safe for everyone
The environment
  • more people replace car journeys with buses
  • all buses are zero-tailpipe emissions  
Economy and places
  • high-quality, flexible and reliable bus services get people where they want to go, when they want to get there and integrate with other services
  • Wales is a centre for innovative technology that helped reduce emissions from buses 
  • decisions about new development take into account the availability of bus services
  • better strategic decision-making about bus services at a national and regional level ensures that government funding supports services that people want to use
  • better real time information and integrated, smart ticketing helps people travel confidently across different modes of transport at the best time and cost for them
Culture and the Welsh language
  • more Welsh speakers can confidently use bus services in the language of their choice
  • buses are a good option for getting to and from major arts and sporting events, and for enjoying Wales’ natural and cultural heritage

Five ways of working 

We will:

  • involve people, including those who share protected characteristics in the design and delivery of bus services, through the Transport for Wales advisory panel
  • integrate equality considerations by taking an inclusive approach to the design of bus services and infrastructure 
  • address decarbonisation through an ultra-low emissions bus fleet and use the investment hierarchy to prioritise bus as part of new transport infrastructure
  • collaborate with local authorities and bus operators to provide reliable bus services and work with planning, health and education to ensure that the availability of bus services is a key consideration in new developments
  • monitor our five-year priorities and review them as needed as well as the long-term contribution of bus to Llwybr Newydd as a whole.

7.3 Rail

Our vision

We want to achieve the efficient and accessible passenger and freight rail services that people and businesses in Wales need, in order to better support our wider well-being ambitions. 

Priorities

Over the next five years we will:

  • deliver our public transport Metro systems in all parts of Wales to improve services and better integrate other public transport and active travel with the rail system 
  • make rail services more attractive and improve customer experiences
  • work with the UK Government to develop the rail element as part of the wider solution to congestion on the M4 
  • work with Network Rail and the UK Government to improve rail infrastructure across Wales, including rolling out rail electrification across Wales, delivering network improvements and extensions, developing new stations and re-opening stations in Wales
  • work with partners to ensure that services and infrastructure are physically accessible to wheelchair users
  • support community rail partnerships as part of our wider engagement with communities and our support for the third sector
  • maintain and manage existing infrastructure under the control of Welsh Government, including upgrades to existing stations and improving the resilience of rail infrastructure to flooding and extreme weather
  • recruit more bilingual staff and provide opportunities for existing staff to learn Welsh and to use the Welsh language
  • press for a stronger voice in rail investment decisions that affect Wales, and ultimately for the full devolution of rail services and infrastructure in Wales and a fair funding settlement.

Well-being ambitions

By 2040 rail will have contributed to our ambitions on well-being because:

People and communities
  • trains and stations are accessible, services are more affordable and everyone feels welcome using rail services 
  • rail travel is safe and secure for all users
  • community rail partnerships are helping to engage more people and communities with rail
The environment
  • rail traction in Wales has moved to low-emissions and eventually to zero-emissions
  • more people take the train instead of using their cars, journeys to and from stations are made by more sustainable modes and more goods have been moved onto rail, so avoiding environmentally sensitive lorry miles
  • we have improved the energy performance of stations and Cardiff Valley Lines infrastructure
  • we have maintained biodiversity and enhanced ecosystem resilience in the day-to-day management of the rail soft estate and in future rail improvements
The economy and places
  • there are more rail services and passenger numbers have increased, making services more viable for all
  • new and existing rail stations are hubs for economic investment and growth
  • digital innovations make rail travel easier, including integrated ticketing and better real-time information for passengers
  • historic rail attractions make a significant contribution to the wider visitor economy of Wales
Culture and the Welsh language 
  • Welsh speakers can confidently use train services in the language of their choice
  • more people can use rail to get to and from major sporting and cultural events
  • historic environment assets have been protected and sustained in rail improvements and developments

Five ways of working 

We will:

  • involve people including those who share protected characteristics in the design and delivery of services, through the Transport for Wales advisory panel and also involve communities in developing new community rail schemes
  • integrate equality considerations by taking an inclusive approach to the design of rail services and infrastructure 
  • address long-term issues such as decarbonisation by electrifying our rail fleet and exploring the use of hydrogen
  • collaborate with colleagues in planning, health and education to locate new developments around existing railway stations
  • monitor our five-year priorities and review them as needed as well as the contribution of rail to Llwybr Newydd as a whole.

7.4 Roads, streets and parking 

Our vision

We will ensure that our roads and streets are safe, well-maintained and managed for all road users, and also support sustainable transport options including active travel and public transport.

Priorities 

Over the next five years we will:

  • maintain and operate the Strategic Road Network in a way that meets our statutory obligations, minimizes adverse environmental impacts, promotes active travel, sustains and creates employment in Wales and reduces the backlog of maintenance
  • introduce a new national default speed limit of 20mph in residential areas and tackle pavement parking
  • keep traffic moving by dealing rapidly with incidents and through efficient forward planning of maintenance to avoid disruptions
  • deliver a strategy for fair road-user charging in Wales as part of a broader package of measures to improve travel choices
  • upgrade, improve and future-proof our road network, addressing congestion pinch points and investing in schemes that support road safety, journey reliability, resilience, modal shift and electric bike, motorbike and vehicle charging
  • improve asset management for road infrastructure to reduce the maintenance backlog, operate more efficiently, free up funding for improvements and maintain and enhance biodiversity, ecosystem resilience and protect historic environment assets on the soft estate
  • work with Natural Resources Wales to manage the impact of climate change on road infrastructure by improving surface water drainage, managing flood risks and ensuring that new developments do not create harmful surface water discharges
  • support local authorities to manage and maintain local roads, and help them adopt unadopted roads and ensure that new residential developments meet common standards
  • develop policies on parking for all vehicle types to drive modal shift to public transport and active travel, taking equality into account  for example, ensuring that parking provision for disabled people is maintained in the design of new schemes and road layouts
  • enhance the Intelligent Transport System to improve real-time and open-source information for users and developers
  • set a target to reduce the maintenance backlog to sustainable levels by 2030
  • work with the UK Government to incorporate existing European Union directives into UK law where they are beneficial to transport in Wales
  • update our Asset Management Strategy, our Procurement Strategy, the Road Safety Framework, our approach to biodiversity and trunk road maintenance standards for Wales and our approach to local speed limits as well as streamlining the way Traffic Regulation Orders are made
  • deliver our Electric Vehicle Charging Strategy and encourage the use of motorbikes and powered light vehicles instead of cars where there are no other transport choices.

Well-being ambitions

By 2040 our approach to roads, streets and parking will have made a significant contribution to well-being because:

People and communities
  • 20mph national speed limits and action on pavement parking in residential areas have made streets safer for all 
  • the road network gives greater priority to public transport and active travel, including cycle lanes and footways 
  • roads and streets are safer for all users and fewer people are killed or seriously injured using them 
The environment
  • fewer car and private vehicles journeys have resulted in better air quality and contribute to decarbonisation
  • electric vehicle/bike charging facilities are readily available through Wales
  • fair and equitable road charging has reduced emissions 
  • technology to regulate traffic speeds has also reduced emissions
  • we have maintained biodiversity and enhanced ecosystem resilience on the soft estate and in road improvements
  • road operations and maintenance consume less energy, produce less waste and use recycled materials if possible
The economy and places
  • quieter urban streets make a positive contribution to place-making in towns and cities
  • less-congested roads make it attractive for businesses to locate to Wales and support the Wales supply chain
  • new technology or automated vehicles are in use, such as Connected and Autonomous Vehicles, Intelligent Speed Assist and Intelligent Transport Systems
  • fewer people live on poorly maintained, unadopted roads 
  • we have ensured the optimum location of parking and effective parking management
Culture and the Welsh language
  • we plan for and manage road use and congestion in and around major cultural and sporting events in Wales
  • the historic environment is protected in road projects and upgrades and in the management of the soft estate
  • we have reduced the impact of cars on Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and National Parks by promoting better local public transport links and introducing park and ride provision

Five ways of working 

We will:

  • involve people, including people who share protected characteristics,  in the design of road upgrades through WelTAG and also consult and engage stakeholders on maintenance works 
  • take an integrated approach to investment decisions, guided by WelTAG appraisals and the priorities in Llwybr Newydd
  • prevent future problems by reducing congestion in order to drive modal shift to active travel and public transport
  • collaborate with colleagues in planning, health and education to ensure that new developments give priority to walking, cycling and public transport
  • monitor our five-year priorities and review them as needed as well as the contribution of roads, streets and parking to Llwybr Newydd. 

7.5 Third sector 

The third sector includes community transport schemes, community rail partnerships, heritage rail services and other third sector transport delivery organisations. 

Our vision

A thriving, viable third sector meets the needs of local communities and delivers wider social, economic, environmental and cultural benefits.

Priorities

Over the next five years we will:

  • ensure that community transport provision is included in travel plans for existing and new transport, health and education services 
  • support existing operators and grow the range of services, responding to community needs
  • grow services that are an alternative to private car ownership such as car clubs
  • better integrate third sector services into wider transport policy, planning and provision
  • introduce Memorandum of Understanding between Welsh Government, Transport for Wales and the Third Sector
  • work with the Traffic Commissioner to ensure that regulation supports volunteer drivers and community operations
  • incorporate information about community and third sector transport services into new transport apps and other journey planning initiatives
  • work with Transport for Wales, Visit Wales and others to promote historic rail and community rail partnerships 
  • provide peer-mentoring, support and training for volunteers
  • better understand the scope, issues and contribution of the third sector and explore the idea of a minimum level of lifeline journey provision in looking at future targets.

Contribution to well-being

By 2040, the third sector will have delivered a significant contribution to our well-being ambitions because:

People and communities
  • there are more lifeline services for people who would not otherwise be able to access conventional public transport
  • we have reduced loneliness and isolation
  • there is better access to health services and education, and effective safeguarding 
  • there is better access to national parks and outdoor recreation
  • we have an active and engaged network of volunteers
The environment
  • there are fewer carbon emissions as more people travel together
  • community transport has made greater use of alternative vehicle technologies
The economy and places
  • a wider range of people can access the retail, health, education work and leisure services they need
  • we are providing services for people in rural areas where other services are infrequent
  • we have boosted the visitor economy and rural jobs through third sector services including historic rail
  • there are more innovative service delivery models including demand responsive travel
Culture and the Welsh language
  • there are more transport services for faith and cultural groups, and better access to sporting and cultural events
  • Wales’ rich transport heritage has been sustained for future generations
  • there are more services and enhanced volunteering opportunities for rural and Welsh-speaking communities

Five ways of working 

We will:

  • actively engage with the community, users and third sector organisations in the design, planning and delivery of third sector services
  • integrate issues such as equality and decarbonisation into planning for third sector services 
  • contribute to decarbonisation across third sector services
  • we will collaborate with local authorities to identify gaps in provision, undertake joint planning and grow the sector through local grants and help connect the sector to wider policy agendas such as health, education and the visitor economy 
  • monitor our five-year priorities and review them as needed as well as the contribution of the third sector to Llwybr Newydd as a whole.

7.6 Taxis and private hire vehicles (PHV) 

Our vision

We want a taxi and private hire vehicle (PHV) licensing system that is fit for a modern Wales, promotes safety for passengers and drivers, contributes to a cleaner environment, improves the customer experience and is accessible by all. 

Priorities

Over the next five years we will:

  • develop national standards for taxis and PHVs in Wales dealing with such issues as the suitability of applicants/licence holders, vehicle safety measures, vehicle testing, record keeping of journeys, and driver and operator training
  • ensure that regulators have the necessary powers to undertake effective enforcement 
  • create and maintain a national licensing database and public register to aid consistency and promote public safety
  • protect existing investment in accessible taxis with cleaner engine technology in order to ensure that we do not reduce the supply of accessible vehicles
  • work with local authorities, the sector, Department for Transport and users to reform the licensing system in order to produce a consistent approach that promotes safety and is less confusing for customers
  • work with partners to ensure that drivers make everyone feel welcome and comply with standards and regulations on accessibility
  • work with the sector to move all taxis and PHVs to zero-emission
  • make certain that the required infrastructure is in place to support the transition to zero-emission taxis.

Well-being ambitions

By 2040, taxis and PHVs will have made a significant contribution to our ambitions on well-being because:

People and communities
  • regardless of where customers live in Wales, they experience a good level of taxi or PHV service with readily available, accessible, safe vehicles, and suitable drivers that provide good customer service
The environment
  • there is less need for private cars and greater use of taxis and PHVs
  • all taxis and private hire vehicles are zero-emission vehicles 
The economy and places
  • taxis and PHVs enable more people to access work, services, leisure and education by complementing public transport services
  • a thriving, professional taxi and PHV sector in Wales benefits from a consistent approach to licensing standards and high standards of driver training and customer service
Culture and the Welsh language
  • taxi and PHV drivers act as important ambassadors for Wales with a key role in introducing visitors to Wales
  • more taxis and PHV drivers are able to greet passengers confidently in Welsh

Five ways of working 

We will:

  • involve the industry, licensing authorities and users in the development of future regulation through external stakeholder group exercises and public consultation
  • integrate taxis and PHVs with other forms of transport, particularly as a last and first mile solution to public transport
  • address long-term issues such as decarbonisation by ensuring the uptake of zero-emission vehicles through incentive schemes
  • collaborate with partners including the Department for Transport and the industry 
  • monitor our five-year priorities and review them as needed as well as the contribution of taxis and private hire vehicles to Llwybr Newydd as a whole.

7.7 Freight and logistics 

Our vision

A competitive, responsive and resilient network of freight and logistics distribution services across Wales that contribute to our wider well-being ambitions. 

Priorities

Over the next five years we will:

  • integrate freight and logistics provision into new development, marine planning, industrial zoning and regeneration and co-locate manufacturing, energy, leisure, and tourism with ports and freight hubs
  • develop a policy response to the significant growth in last-mile and express delivery, understanding how best to manage this alongside our ambitions to reduce congestion and tackle decarbonisation
  • promote the importance of freight and logistics and the contribution it makes to the well-being of Wales 
  • support skills and job retention within freight and logistics sectors
  • work with the UK Government, the sector and other partners on a Logistics and Freight Plan for Wales
  • work with the Traffic Commissioner and sector operators to improve understanding of safety issues and compliance 
  • support interventions that shift freight from road to rail and water-based transport, and future innovations that will make the sector more sustainable
  • work with the sectors to better understand the complex interactions between freight, logistics and the wider network, and set meaningful targets for decarbonisation 
  • work with the sector to harness improvements in technology for more efficient movement of goods

Well-being ambitions

By 2040 freight and logistics will have made a significant contribution to well-being in Wales because:

People and communities
  • people in rural and urban areas across Wales can access the goods and services they need through an effective, sustainable supply chain  
  • the networks which move both goods and people are safe and secure for both kinds of activity without disadvantaging connectivity or capability
The environment 
  • there are fewer greenhouse gas emissions, better air quality and less environmental noise from freight and logistics
  • goods are moved more sustainably through multi-modal hubs and shared logistics 
  • innovations have helped created low-carbon logistics networks, including demand-management measures to influence consumer behaviour 
The economy and places
  • a high-grade freight and logistics network supports existing businesses and facilitates new investment and employment
  • freight and logistics are integrated into wider transport and land-use planning policy at local, regional and national levels
  • Wales has the infrastructure, capability and capacity to support a more sustainable freight and logistics sector, including innovative business models that encourage commercial growth alongside decarbonisation
Culture and the Welsh language
  • a thriving home-grown supply-chain management sector, with a skilled and diverse workforce, helps sustain local communities, including Welsh-speaking communities

Five ways of working 

We will:

  • involve industry, operators and users of the freight and logistics networks in taking forward the approach to freight and logistics 
  • integrate the need to move freight into wider transport planning for road, rail, ports, aviation and active travel to avoid unintended impacts that may impair the efficient movement of freight
  • reduce the long-term environmental impact of moving goods across Wales 
  • collaborate across government to reflect the role of freight and logistics in other policy areas including decarbonisation, regional economic growth, housing/industrial zoning, energy, and land-use/marine planning. 
  • monitor our five-year priorities and review them as needed as well as the contribution of freight and logistics to Llwybr Newydd as a whole. 

7.8 Ports and maritime transport 

Our vision

We will adopt a more strategic approach to Welsh ports and nearby development sites, recognising their role as a catalyst for co-location of manufacturing, energy, leisure, distribution and tourism.

Priorities

Over the next five years we will:

  • invest in projects that deliver more sustainable ports infrastructure and which contribute to decarbonisation in the sector, including further consideration of the positive environmental impacts that modal shift towards coastal shipping could support
  • work with the Welsh Ports Group and other partners on a Welsh Ports and Maritime Strategy for Wales which reflects the challenges and opportunities of the new post-EU exit context that ports – and the businesses which are reliant upon them – must now operate within
  • working with ports in Wales to identify opportunities for future economic development such as offshore renewable energy and innovations in decarbonisation
  • acknowledge ports and maritime transport as a key facet of a wider policy on freight and logistics
  • review the constraints and opportunities of the planning system in relation to ports, seeking to reduce barriers to investment, increase efficiency and better facilitate co-location and integration of activity whilst maintaining high standards for sustainability
  • work with the UK Government and other decision makers on shared objectives for ports
  • develop a better understanding of risks and opportunities through regular and ongoing engagement with the industry
  • support the contribution of our ports to the visitor economy across Wales.

Well-being ambitions

By 2040 ports and harbours will have made a significant contribution to our well-being ambitions because:

People and communities
  • ports and harbours increase levels of activity in Wales by supporting leisure and active travel including sailing, rowing and sporting opportunities 
The environment 
  • maritime transport is more energy efficient and supports low-carbon logistics networks in Wales
  • the efficient operation and development of ports and harbours supports marine conservation and the marine environment
The economy and places
  • ports and harbours lead a green maritime recovery across Wales, including renewable energy projects, industrial decarbonisation and offshore renewables
  • Welsh ports act as international gateways, increasing trade and inward investment opportunities in Wales
  • ports and harbours are focal point for investment, delivering local jobs and services and benefits to the wider economy of Wales
Culture and the Welsh language
  • Welsh speakers are able to travel using the language of their choice 
  • historic environment assets, including Wales’ rich maritime history, are protected and sustained in the operation and growth of ports and harbours.

Five ways of working 

We will:

  • involve the sector and others in future thinking about ports strategy
  • integrate ports and maritime into wider transport planning and development
  • prevent and mitigate impacts on the environment that result from ports and maritime transport 
  • collaborate with economic development, green energy, leisure and tourism to maximise the role that ports and maritime transport can play in achieving wider objectives 
  • monitor our five-year priorities and review them as needed as well as the contribution of ports and maritime transport to Llwybr Newydd as a whole.

7.9 Aviation 

Our vision

We are committed to maintaining an aviation capacity in Wales, because of the benefits that it brings to the Welsh economy as a whole, whilst recognising the challenges this creates for meeting our targets on decarbonisation.

Priorities

Over the next five years we will:

  • develop Cardiff Airport to enable Welsh-based passengers to fly from closer to home 
  • work with the UK Government and the Jet Zero initiative, as well as with Cardiff Airport, to reduce the environmental impacts of aviation
  • support Cardiff Airport to recover from the impact of COVID-19 on the business and wider industry
  • engage with UK airports and other devolved administrations to improve regional connectivity to Wales as part of the regional planning process
  • continue to work with the UK Government on levelling up UK-wide aviation policy specifically for Wales, including continuing the pursuit of devolution of Air Passenger Duty (APD) to Wales and via the introduction of new Public Service Obligation (PSO) air services
  • continue to explore opportunities to better connect Cardiff and Wales with the rest of the UK and Europe.

Well-being ambitions

By 2040 aviation will contribute to well-being in Wales because:

People and communities

Cardiff Airport is accessible and staff have the skills and training to ensure that everyone feels welcome and is supported where appropriate

The environment
  • there are fewer greenhouse gas emissions from Wales-based aviation 
  • Cardiff Airport has a robust decarbonisation strategy, delivering measures such as onsite generation, energy exporting and carbon neutral buildings
Places and the economy
  • communities across Wales, including rural communities, benefit from better, safer local and international connectivity 
  • good connectivity means that businesses are confident about relocating to Wales and staying in Wales, whilst Welsh businesses are reaching new markets
  • the aviation supply chain and general aviation deliver benefits to economically disadvantaged areas that have traditionally suffered from lack of quality employment
  • Wales is a centre for skills in aircraft maintenance and engineering, prominent in the national and international delivery of Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) services
  • we have helped grow international visitors to Wales and business passengers safeguarding jobs in the visitor economy across Wales
Culture and the Welsh language
  • more international visitors will discover and enjoy our rich cultural heritage and language
  • more Welsh speakers will be able to travel using the Welsh language

Five ways of working 

We will:

  • involve users, including people who share protected characteristics, in the design and upgrading of facilities for passengers
  • take an integrated approach to aviation, recognising the links between aviation and regional and national development in Wales
  • collaborate with others including the UK and devolved administrations and local authorities to understand the role of aviation in other strategic policy areas
  • work with the UK Government to reduce emissions from aviation in Wales
  • monitor our five-year priorities and review them as needed, as well as the contribution aviation to Llwybr Newydd as a whole.
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