THE BODY searching for better ways to delivering justice in Wales went to Butetown in Cardiff yesterday (Wednesday 17th October).

First published:
24 October 2018
Last updated:
 Members of the Commission on Justice in Wales at the event at the Butetown Community Centre in Cardiff. From left; Sir Wyn Williams, Juliet Lyon, Sarah Payne and Peter Vaughan

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THE BODY searching for better ways to delivering justice in Wales went to Butetown in Cardiff yesterday (Wednesday 17th October).

Around 40 people came to the sessions held in the Butetown Community Centre on Loudon Square to share their views on policing, justice and the legal system in general.

They were local residents and professionals working in the justice system in Wales and their contributions will be used by the members of the commission in collecting their findings for reporting next year.

Commission member Sarah Payne chaired the session in Butetown. She said: "It's really important that we're not seen as a group of people in a room talking amongst ourselves.

"We very much want the outcome of our work to be informed by what people have told us matters in Wales and there's nothing quite like hearing somebody's story to make you sit up and think."

Sarah is the former Director for the National Offender Management Service in Wales, Chief Executive of the Wales Probation Trust and Chair of the All Wales Criminal Justice Board.

The event followed a similar session in Pontypridd on Tuesday where members of the commission met professionals and survivors of domestic abuse from South Wales.

Last week saw the publication of a paper on a possible Law Council of Wales, which the commission has invited views on. 

The Commission on Justice in Wales was set up in 2017 by the Welsh Government to review the operation of the justice system in Wales and set a long-term vision for its future.

The commission is travelling around Wales and the wider UK taking evidence from people about their experiences and what they think should change.