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Know the latest risk to your poultry and pet birds and steps you must take.

First published:
6 December 2018
Last updated:

Avian Influenza Prevention Zone declared

The Minister for Rural Affairs and North Wales, and Trefnydd declared an all-Wales Avian Influenza Prevention Zone which came into force on 3 November 2021. As of 29 November 2021, the declaration was extended and it is mandatory to house your birds, or keep them separated from wild birds.

Biosecurity guidance and a biosecurity self-assessment checklist have been developed to assist keepers with these requirements.

Change to bird gathering rules

As of 8 November 2021, gatherings of:

  • galliforme (including pheasants, partridge, quail, chickens, turkey, guinea fowl) birds and
  • anseriforme (including ducks, geese, swans) birds

may no longer take place. This follows an increase in risk from avian influenza.

Amended General Licence for bird gatherings.

Confirmed cases

Avian influenza has been confirmed in birds at premises in Wales, England, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Cases in Wales

The following cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 have been confirmed at premises in Wales. Further information and current statuses can be found below.

Cases in England which affect Wales

Cases in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland

For details of cases in:

Confirmed case in Cheshire, England

Status Update: 13/01/2022 - Avian Influenza has been confirmed at a premises near Tattenhall in Cheshire, England.

Avian Influenza has been confirmed at a premises near Tattenhall in Cheshire, England on 13 January. 

3km and 10km disease control zones have been declared around the premises by Defra. A small area of the 10km zone declared by Defra extends into Wales. An equivalent 10km Surveillance Zone and Restricted Zone have been declared for the relevant area in Wales.

Check where disease control zones are currently located and if you are in a zone on the Animal and Plant Health Agency interactive map.

Confirmed case on Anglesey, Wales

Status Update: 27/12/2021 - The Surveillance Zone and the Restricted Zone have been revoked.   

Avian influenza was confirmed in a backyard flock on the Isle of Anglesey on 25 November 2021. Following further testing this was confirmed as highly pathogenic avian influenza on 26 November 2021.

Following successful completion of disease control activities and surveillance within the zone, on 27th December - the Surveillance Zone and the Restricted Zone have been revoked.    

Local movement restrictions have now been removed but the Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) measures remain in place.

Confirmed case in Shropshire, England

Status Update: 15/12/2021 - Avian Influenza has been confirmed at a premises in Shropshire, England.

3km and 10km disease control zones have been declared around the premises by Defra. An area of the 10km zone declared by Defra extends into Wales.

 An equivalent 10km Surveillance Zone and a 10km Restricted Zone have been declared for the relevant area in Wales.

Check where disease control zones are currently located and if you are in a zone on the Animal and Plant Health Agency interactive map.

Confirmed case near Clifford, Herefordshire, England

Status Update: 10/12/2021 - Avian Influenza has been confirmed at a premises near Clifford, Hereford and South Herefordshire, Herefordshire, England. 

3km and 10km disease control zones have been declared around the premises by Defra. An area of both the 3km and the 10km zone declared by Defra extends into Wales. An equivalent 3km Protection Zone, 10km Surveillance Zone and Restricted Zone have been declared for the relevant area in Wales.

Check where disease control zones are currently located and if you are in a zone on the Animal and Plant Health Agency interactive map.

Confirmed case near Crickhowell, Wales

Status Update: 10/01/2022 - The Surveillance Zone and the Restricted Zone have been revoked.   

Avian influenza was confirmed at a premises near Crickhowell, Powys on 3 December 2021.

Following successful completion of disease control activities and surveillance within the zone, on 10 January 2022 the Surveillance Zone and the Restricted Zone have been revoked.

Local movement restrictions have now been removed but the Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) measures remain in place.

Confirmed case near Leominster, Herefordshire, England

Status Update: 14/01/2022 - The Surveillance Zone and the Restricted Zone have been revoked.   

Avian Influenza was confirmed at a premises in Herefordshire, England on 2 December. 

Following successful completion of disease control activities and surveillance within the zone, on 14 January 2022, the disease control zones in England and the Surveillance Zone and the Restricted Zone in Wales have been revoked.

Local movement restrictions have now been removed but the Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) measures remain in place.

Confirmed case at Wrexham County Borough, Wales

Status Update: 03/12/2021 - The Surveillance Zone and the Restricted Zone have been revoked.

Avian influenza was confirmed in a backyard flock in Wrexham County on 1 November 2021. Following further testing this was confirmed as highly pathogenic avian influenza on 2 November 2021.

Following successful completion of disease control activities and surveillance within the zone, on 3 December the Surveillance Zone and the Restricted Zone have been revoked.

Local movement restrictions have now been removed but the Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) measures remain in place.

Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) virus

The risk of HPAI virus (bird flu) increases during the winter. We have identified that migratory waterfowl and gulls are the most likely cause of HPAI incursion. (Migratory wildfowl include ducks, geese and swans.) This is based on experience over the last two winters, coupled with scientific and veterinary opinion.

Avian Influenza in wild birds

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) carries out year-round avian influenza surveillance of dead wild birds. This is submitted via public reports and warden patrols.

There have been multiple recent findings of HPAI H5N1 in wild birds from sites across GB. For further details see the report (updated weekly) of findings of HPAI in wild birds in Great Britain and our outbreak assessments.

If you find dead wild waterfowl (swans, geese or ducks) or other dead wild birds, such as gulls or birds of prey, you should report them to the Defra helpline (03459 33 55 77).

Do not touch or pick up any dead or visibly sick wild birds that you find.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) will collect some of these birds and test them to help us understand how the disease is distributed geographically and in different types of bird.

More information on how to report and dispose of wild birds.

Higher Risk Areas (HRAs)

Migratory waterfowl and gulls pose a threat as they could introduce this virus onto premises where poultry, game birds, pet or other captive birds are kept. This could be through direct contact, or indirect contact, such as via bird droppings. We have identified areas of GB which are at increased risk of the introduction of the HPAI virus into poultry and kept birds from wild waterfowl. We refer to these as 'Higher Risk Areas' (HRAs).

You should note that, although these areas are at increased risk, all poultry could be at risk from wild birds. Including:

  • game birds
  • poultry kept as pets

HRAs: frequently asked questions (FAQs) 

What measures are required in a HRA?

We use HRAs to:

  • target wild bird and statutory surveillance programmes
  • highlight the areas of GB at greatest risk of bird flu being present in wild birds

We may consider extra biosecurity through the declaration of an Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ). The declaration of such a zone would be risk-based.

Mandatory housing of free range birds would not necessarily be introduced in HRAs alone. Any decision to house birds anywhere in GB would be according to risk considerations.

If you are planning a new poultry unit you should take into account the risk of HPAI in that area.

What should I do if I keep poultry or captive birds?

If you keep poultry, including game birds, pet or other captive birds anywhere in GB, you should review your biosecurity. This is particularly important if you are in or close to a higher risk area. We encourage all keepers to follow our biosecurity advice. It offers best practice, whether you have commercial flocks, smaller flocks, game birds, or pet birds.

Is my holding in/near a Higher Risk Area?

You are considered to be in an HRA if the whole or part of your premises falls within the HRA.