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Appendix 1: steering group members

We are deeply grateful to all the Steering Group members who have guided, enabled and acted as critical friends to finish this plan.

The following members have been able to agree to have their names published. We equally value the work of those who for different reasons, need to stay anonymous.

The co-chairs are Professor Emmanuel Ogbonna and Dr Andrew Goodall.

Members

  • Amanda Hill-Dixon, Wales Centre for Public Policy.
  • Anna Skeels, Wales Centre for Public Policy.
  • Daniel Hurford, Welsh Local Government Association.
  • Emma Wools, Criminal Justice in Wales Steering Group and Race Equality Delivery Group.
  • Gaynor Legall, Statues and Monuments Audit working group.
  • Ginger Wiegand, Equality and Human Rights Commission.
  • Gurmit Singh Randhawa, Faith Communities Forum.
  • Helal Uddin, Ethnic Minorities Youth Support Team Wales.
  • Judge Ray Singh, COVID-19 Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Health Advisory Group.
  • Lloyd Williams, Ethnic Minorities Youth Support Team Wales.
  • Maria Constanza Mesa, Women Connect First.
  • Professor Keshav Singhal, COVID-19 Risk Assessment Subgroup.
  • Professor Meena Upadhyaya, Non-Executive Director, Welsh Government.
  • Professor Robert Moore, North Wales Regional Equality Network.
  • Professor Tracy Myhill, NHS Wales.
  • Professor Uzo Iwobi OBE, Race Council Cymru and former Specialist Policy Advisor to Welsh Government.
  • Professor Pushpinder S Mangat, NHS Wales.
  • Rajvi Glasbrook, Communities, Contributions and Cynefin: Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic experiences and the new curriculum Working Group.
  • Rocio Cifuentes, Ethnic Minorities Youth Support Team Wales.
  • Shavanah Taj, Wales TUC.
  • Tamsin Ramasut, Mela Cymru.
  • Trudy Aspinwall, Travelling Ahead Project, TGP Cymru.
  • Wales Race Forum.
  • Welsh Government Minority Ethnic Support Network.

Appendix 2: community mentors

We had the skills, lived experiences and support of 17 Community Mentors who supported different policy officials from the Welsh Government. We are very grateful to all of them for their dedication and expertise.

The following mentors have been able to agree to have their names published. We equally value the work of those who for different reasons, need to stay anonymous:

  • Aisha Ali
  • Cindy Ikie
  • Daljit Nijjer
  • Helal Uddin
  • Indu Deglurkar
  • Jacquline Alcinder
  • Jan Birch
  • Juhela Rahman-Daultrey
  • Michelle Alexis
  • Mohid Khan
  • Saadia Abubakar
  • Star Moyo
  • Tom Tom Hendry
  • Yaina Samuels

Appendix 3: community grant groups pre and during consultation

We are also grateful to many groups and organisations who delivered insightful reports on their communities’ experiences, either through the Community Grant work, or by sending in their reports, hosting events and participating in the consultation. They include the following:

  • Action for Art
  • Antur Teifi
  • Avant Cymru
  • Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic mental Health Support
  • Black Lives Matter Wales and Race Council Cymru
  • Butetown Community Centre Association
  • Cardiff University Centre for Islamic Studies and Muslim Council of Wales
  • Children in Wales
  • Diverse Cymru
  • Ethnic Minority Women in Welsh Healthcare
  • Henna Foundation
  • Hindu Cultural Association, Wales
  • Horn Development Association
  • Hyatt Womens Trust
  • KIRAN
  • Mudiad Meithrin
  • National Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Youth Forum
  • Neath Port Talbot BME Association
  • North Wales Africa Society
  • North Wales Regional Equality Network (NWREN)
  • Opinion 8
  • Race Council Cymru:
    • Cardiff Region
    • North Wales Region
    • Newport Region
    • Swansea Region
    • West Wales Region
  • South Riverside Centre and Bevan Foundation
  • Sub-Sahara Advisory Panel
  • Tros Gynnal Plant Cymru
  • The Polish School
  • The Privilege Café
  • The Romani Cultural and Arts Company
  • Welsh Refugee Council
  • Women Connect First

Appendix 4: vision, purpose and values

Vision

An anti-racist Wales.

In our shaping of this work, amongst the main themes that emerged, anti-racism was key, and so central to this work. Other themes included the notions of equity, social justice and celebrating diversity in all its forms.

Contributors felt that they wanted to see a Wales where there is a “shared understanding, and agreed actions” for tackling systemic and institutional racism, for example, the ways in which racism is and historically has been embedded in the working of organisations they encounter. The goal should be to “create equitable outcomes”, which “celebrate differences and similarities among minority ethnic communities” where we are “united not divided by our differences”.

We want to work “together, as white and ethnic minority people, to jointly make a different and better Wales”.

Purpose

To collectively make a significant change to the lives of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic people by tackling racism.

Those who were involved in shaping this work felt that the purpose of this work was thought to be to create “urgency and culture change that make public services publicly accountable” and “delivers on promised actions” to reduce inequalities in various areas of our duties and powers.

It was suggested that the Welsh Government and public services needed to “have difficult conversations without fear of retribution” so that we can achieve “the change we want to see”. People felt that we will only do this by tackling systemic and institutional racism, by “speaking truth to power” and creating a “new legacy for anti-racism that includes equitable outcomes for our communities”.

Additionally, there was a strong hope that we could create a “new legacy of public services that include leaders from the Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic communities who have been recognised for their potential, talent and unique contribution”.

Values

In the values below “We” refers to the participants and the Welsh Government together.

Lived experiences

  • We believe that our lived experiences should be “included” at the heart of all decision making in Wales.
  • We have a right to be “heard and to sit at the top table” and hear decisions you make about us.
  • We believe that our “challenges from all the different groups, should be heard as helping you to do your jobs better”, and “our history and oppression more acknowledged” while respecting “the emotional toll of sharing”.

Rights-based

  • We believe that we are asking “only for our rights, as opposed to favours” in all you do.
  • It is the responsibility of those in power to “serve justice”, “enforce” and hold “to account” those responsible for services and decision making.
  • We believe that by 2030 we should all be seen as “Welsh”, with “the problem of racism, which leaves trauma that “affects mental health for years no longer upon on our shoulders”.

Open and transparent

  • We believe that “we can walk the talk of equality”.
  • There should be no “in groups” and no “out groups”, but instead a Wales where people are valued for their unique talents and lived experiences which, while different, are of equal worth.
  • We believe that “living in a place where you can be free to have challenging discussions and not fear repercussions of exclusion because of institutional racism, will emancipate us”.

Appendix 5: terms of reference External Accountability Group

Background

The Anti-racist Wales Plan sets out a co-designed and agreed vision, purpose and values which will underpin the work of the Accountability Group.

A Vision of

“A Wales that is anti-racist.”

Purpose

“To collectively make a measurable difference to the lives of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic people in Wales.”

Values

“To be open and transparent, to have lived experience at the heart of all it does and to be rights-based.”

The development plan highlighted the issue of a lack of trust in all sectors for supporting and enabling race equality actions; and an ‘implementation gap’ where well-intentioned work and plans fail to deliver against stated ambitions.

For the Anti-racist Wales Plan to achieve its vision and purpose there will need to be constant work to secure and maintain trust with ethnic minority individuals, groups and communities and to ensure a sustained focus on implementation.

The Anti-racist Wales Plan Accountability Group (the Group) will work actively and in collaboration with the Internal Welsh Government Challenge and Support Group, the Race Disparity Evidence Unit, and with regional Race and other protected group fora. It will ensure compatibility and coherence with other Welsh Government equality strands and policy. Appendix 7 shows the role and remit of the Welsh Government’s Internal Support and Challenge Group.

Purpose

The overarching purpose of the Accountability Group will be to ensure progress towards the purpose of the plan by holding those responsible to account for what they do or don’t deliver. The responsibility for ensuring implementation lies with those policy leads and wider sectors who are responsible for the actions.

The Group will also be a central point for the governance of all race-related work in the Welsh Government and ensures that work is joined up in both in the shaping and in the delivery phases. It will also scrutinise compliance with Equalities legislation. The Group will assess the extent to which progress is being made towards the vision and challenge, support (including co-design) and advise on any areas of anti-racism which they think need to be explored based on new challenges and successes as they emerge.

The remit of the Group will include:

  • setting priorities for the Goals and Actions they consider important and urgent
  • receiving and scrutinising reports from the Internal Welsh Government Support and Challenge Group
  • requesting Ministerial attendance for specific agenda items
  • assessing, challenging and reporting on progress in achieving the vision by implementing the goals and actions in the plan, ensuring progress is making a material difference to the lived experience of ethnic minority people in Wales
  • identifying key new policies needed and supporting any co-design of them
  • identifying and making recommendations on emerging themes and new actions to make progress to towards the vision and champion good practice
  • to play a key role and have influence in the development of the Race Disparity Evidence Unit work programme so that the group can respond to concerns about patterns of racism or where the desired change does not materialise when actions are implemented. This includes suggesting quantitative or qualitative data collection or analysis to fill gaps in the evidence base. These evidence based projects could be carried out or commissioned (for example, from Wales Centre for Public Policy) by the Unit to meet this remit
  • inviting organisations, including Commissioners, regulators, inspection and audit bodies to discuss issues in their areas of influence
  • making recommendations for using to their maximum impact, existing government levers and requesting the strengthening any Government levers it deems necessary to progress on anti-racism
  • convening Task and Finish groups as requested by Welsh Ministers or identified by themselves and in consultation with the Welsh Government
  • inviting, on an ad hoc basis, any expert the Group thinks will add value to give support, evidence or steer on a particular issue
  • ensuring an intersectional approach to all the policy work
  • annually publishing public statements of progress

Resources for the Group

The Accountability Group will have an assigned amount of financial resources allocated to it annually to commission reports, research and other items as they deem necessary.

Ways of working

The Group will have the values of the plan as a guiding principle for its ways of working. This will mean providing challenge with high support, ensuring that the lived experiences of ethnic minority people are always informing progress, that transparency and openness are observed and that the approach is rights-based rather than based on favour and so to be anti-racist.

One of the strong messages which emerged during the development of the plan was that governance arrangements which oversee implementation should enable people to take action. Therefore, the Group will make recommendations on the levers and tools which should be used to drive change and focus attention and resources. Some levers like evidence can be pulled by the Accountability Group, and others can only be exercised by those responsible, for example, by the Welsh Government for remit letters, for grants conditions etc. As the implementation progresses, the need for further levers, either to be used by government or by the Accountability Group, will be discussed with Welsh Ministers.

In order to maintain a high level of dialogue to wider groups of ethnic minority and other stakeholders across Wales, the Group will ensure an active dialogue with the regional forums for Race and other protected groups.

The Group will be supported by the Race Disparity Evidence Unit, and where intersectionality is important the wider Equality, Race and Disability Evidence Units to provide quantitative and qualitative data. The latter will ensure and include lived experiences.

The Race Disparity Evidence Unit will also support the publication of an annual report on progress.

Membership

Co-Chairs: Prof. Ogbonna, Cardiff University and Andrew Goodall, Permanent Secretary.

Eight diversity representation

Appointments of the diversity representatives will be designed to reflect and invite representation by expression of interest, in an open and transparent way, of:

  • Eight diversity representatives of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic groups, representing different parts of Wales and including:
    • women
    • future generations
    • LGBTQ+ people
    • disabled people
    • young people
    • elders
    • refugees and asylum seekers
    • Gypsy, Roma, Traveller communities

We propose that the diversity representatives will be:

  • people living and working (unless a young person or older person) in Wales
  • have personal/direct experience of racism
  • provide intersectional representation
  • have experience of, or a willingness to, engage in a process of supporting policy and service improvement and providing constructive challenge

They may not necessarily be members of organisations working on issues relating to race (although they could be and, if they are, we will need a balance of organisations represented) but will have some capacity/scope/means to locate their representation within wider communities in Wales (for example, not disconnected individuals).

As a group, the diversity representatives will be:

  • varied in their backgrounds and experience
  • from varied organisations, should they work for one, to ensure a variety in the organisations represented

The Welsh Government can consider paying for them as long as there is a transparent process to appoint them.

Seven experts by experience and expertise on anti-racism recruited

Seven experts by lived experience with expertise in implementing anti-racist policies, linked to the areas of the plan’s focus of the implementation recruited via an open and transparent way for 2 years.

They will differ from the diversity representatives in that they:

  • might live or work outside Wales (although we would not want all of them to)
  • have expertise in anti-racist practice in different contexts relevant to the implementation of the plan
  • but as a group, still offer variety in experience, backgrounds and some intersectionality

Again, the Welsh Government would seek the best route to securing payments for these individuals and again, recruit them in an open and transparent manner.

Representation (time limited until their work is concluded) from current work on anti-racism for the Welsh Government:

  • Prof Charlotte Williams
  • Gaynor Legall

Representation invited from:

  • Equality and Human Rights Commission
  • WLGA
  • Wales TUC
  • WCVA
  • Welsh Government Minority Ethnic Staff Network (MESN)

Policy co-designer/advisors

  • Head of the Anti-racist Wales Implementation Team.
  • Director for Communities and Tackling Poverty.
  • Senior Policy Lead for Equalities in the Welsh Government (is Board member).
  • Chief Nursing Officer for Wales.

Policy leads responsible for implementation

Policy leads should attend as observers but can participate when the discussion relates to their policy areas.

Welsh Ministers will be invited to the Accountability Group on an ad hoc basis to provide an opportunity to share progress updates and plans within their Ministries to achieve an anti-racist Wales.

Twice a year the First Minister (or Minister this is delegated to) will be invited to receive an update on progress, successes and areas for further focus as seen by the Accountability Group.

Relevant Commissioners, Regulators, Audit and Inspection bodies will be invited to attend at least once.

Secretariat

A senior member of the Anti-racist Wales Implementation team will liaise with the co-Chairs regularly and secretariat will be provided by the Welsh Government but agenda items will be determined and led by members and the co-Chairs.

Frequency of meetings

The Group will meet every 2 months.

Reporting and escalation

The Group will agree an Annual Progress Report, and timing for it will be agreed at their first meeting.

The External Chair will also meet with the First Minister and with the Minister for Social Justice twice a year to raise any discussion the First Minister or the Minister for Social Justice deems appropriate.

Appendix 6: terms of reference Internal Support and Challenge Group

Background

The Anti-racist Wales Plan sets out a co-designed and agreed vision, purpose and values which will underpin the Internal Support and Challenge Group.

A Vision of

“A Wales that is anti-racist.”

Purpose

“To collectively make a measurable difference to the lives of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic people in Wales.”

Values

“To be open and transparent, to have lived experience at the heart of all it does and to be rights-based.”

The development plan highlighted the issue of a lack of trust in all sectors for supporting and enabling race equality actions; and an ‘implementation gap’ where well-intentioned work and plans fail to deliver against stated ambitions. For the Anti-racist Wales Plan to achieve its vision and purpose there will need to be constant work to secure and maintain trust with ethnic minority individuals, groups and communities and to ensure a sustained focus on implementation.

The Welsh Government Anti-racist Wales Plan Internal Challenge and Support Group (“the Group”) will work actively and in collaboration with the Accountability Group, the Race Disparity Evidence Unit and other internal stakeholders, and with regional race and other protected group fora. It will ensure compatibility and coherence with other Welsh Government equality strands and policy. See appendix 5 for the role and remit of the Welsh Government’s Accountability Group.

Purpose

The overarching purpose of the Group will be to ensure timely delivery and progress towards the purpose of the plan for those actions that lie within the control or influence of the Welsh Government, including through funding.

The Group will also be a central point for the governance of all race-related work in the Welsh Government and ensure that work is joined up in both in the shaping and in the delivery phases. It will also ensure work done is in compliance with Equalities legislation. The Group will present to the Accountability Group, the extent to which progress is being made on actions that the Welsh Government has committed

to and propose to the Accountability Group, new and emerging priorities.

The remit of the Group will include:

  • preparing reports outlining progress for policy/ impact areas tor the Accountability Group
  • supporting Ministers in their reports to the Accountability Group and keeping them updated on progress
  • building capacity and capability in anti-racist practice within the Group and disseminating that within the Welsh Government
  • challenging and supporting colleagues to increase the impact of the plan and to support joined up working
  • sharing good practice and challenges with the Group
  • engaging in cross-cutting issues identified in the plan and wider
  • identifying key new policies needed and supporting any co-design of them
  • inviting organisations, including Commissioners, regulators, inspection and audit bodies to discuss issues in their areas of influence
  • supporting Task and Finish Groups established by the Accountability Group as and when requested by Welsh Ministers
  • ensuring an intersectional approach to all the policy work

Ways of working

The Internal Support and Challenge Group and the Accountability Group should complement and support each other, guided by the values of the plan. This will mean providing challenge with high support, ensuring that the lived experiences of ethnic minority people are always informing progress, that transparency and openness are observed and that the approach is rights based and anti-racist.

The Group will ensure an active dialogue wider groups of ethnic minority and other stakeholders across Wales.

The Group will be supported by the Race Disparity Evidence Unit, and where needed by the Equality Evidence Unit to provide quantitative and qualitative data.

Membership

  • Chair: Director, Communities and Tackling Poverty.
  • Deputy Director, Communities Division.
  • Head of the Anti-racist Wales Implementation Team.
  • Head of Race, Faith and Gypsy, Traveller Policy.
  • Head of Race Disparity Evidence Unit.
  • Head of Community Cohesion.
  • Representative from KAS.
  • Policy Leads leading on respective policy areas:
    • Health
    • Mental Health
    • Social Care
    • Education (Schools)
    • Education (Comms)
    • Education (HE)
    • Education (FE)
    • Education (Adult Learning and ESOL)
    • Employability and Skills
    • Apprenticeships
    • Welsh Government HR
    • Public Appointments
    • Local Government
    • Culture, Heritage and Sport
    • Social Partnership and Fair Work
    • Entrepreneurship (and Business)
    • Housing and Accommodation
    • Crime and Justice
    • Environment
    • Welsh Language
    • Childcare, Play and Early Years
    • Child Care Inspection
    • Climate Change
    • Rural Affairs
    • Children and Families

Others may be added as they develop their action plans.

Seven experts by experience and expertise on anti-racism recruited

Seven experts by lived experience with expertise in implementing anti-racist policies, linked to the areas of the plan’s focus of the implementation recruited via an open and transparent way for 2 years.

They will be remunerated and we will recruit them in an open and transparent manner. The 7 experts will also sit on the Accountability Group.

Secretariat

A member of the Anti-racist Wales Implementation Team will liaise with the Chair regularly and secretariat will be provided by the Implementation Team. Agenda items will be determined and led by members and the Chair and it is anticipated the agenda will be determined in close liaison with the Accountability Group.

Frequency of meetings

The Group will meet every month.

Reporting

The Group will report to the Permanent Secretary or nominated deputy.

Appendix 7: references

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Action on disability: the right to independent living framework and action plan Advancing gender equality: action plan.

Refugee and asylum seeker plan (nation of sanctuary) LGBTQ+ Action Plan consultation.