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What you should do if you are organising or hosting a party for children.

First published:
14 June 2021
Last updated:

Introduction

A birthday, celebration or a school leaver’s party for children and young people (under the age of 18 on 31 August 2020) can be held but you must consider where you are holding the party and then what requirements and guidelines are in place for these venues refer to the organised children's activity FAQs.

Remember, we are asking people to consider not just what they can do – what the law allows them to do – but what they should do – what is the right thing to do to minimise the spread of coronavirus. In particular, we ask you to:

  • please try to be restrained in how many different people you see. It is better to see the same five people regularly than to see lots of different people occasionally
  • please maintain social distancing indoors. You do not have to socially distance outdoors, but you might want to if you are mixing with people you don’t normally mix with
  • avoid doing activities that might increase the risk of transmission (for example shouting to be heard over loud music, or singing in close proximity)
  • anyone over the age of 11 still needs to wear a face covering when indoors in public places especially if it’s difficult to stay distanced

If you do gather with others for this purpose, it is very important you follow guidance on social distancing, cough and cold hygiene and follow the rules on face coverings in indoor public places. You should also continue to wash your hands frequently or use hand sanitiser gel. 

You should only host a children’s party if you and all attending are completely well, anyone who has any symptoms of coronavirus, adult or child, must remain at home, self-isolate and take a test. If you live with someone who has symptoms, adult or child, you should also self-isolate and take a test. If you have been informed by NHS Wales Test Trace Protect you have come into close contact with someone who has had a positive test for coronavirus, you will be required by law to self-isolate. You must not leave your home unless there is an exceptional circumstance (attending a party isn’t an exceptional circumstance) to permit this in an emergency. Where the symptomatic person is a child, their school and / or childcare setting should be informed.

Can I plan a children’s party in a venue such as a community centre, indoor play centre, ice rink, cinema, café, restaurant etc?

Yes, you can plan the party at these venues. These venues are examples of regulated premises. The current restrictions for meeting indoors allow members of your extended household or up to six people from up to six households (not including children under 11 from any of the households present or carers of any person present) to meet indoors. Your contact at the premises can advise you on the rules they have in place, the measures they have put in place and their restrictions on numbers of who can attend the party. 

Can I plan a children’s party in my home?

Yes, you can. The current restrictions for meeting indoors allows members of your extended household or up to six people from up to six households (not including children under 11 from any of the households present or carers of any person present) to meet indoors in private homes and holiday accommodation. 

Attending or organising an indoor house party in breach of the permitted gathering regulations is a criminal offence. There is a penalty for taking part in a house party indoors which breaches the Regulations and a higher penalty for organising such parties.

Can I plan a children’s party in my garden?

Yes, as from Saturday 17 July there are no longer any restrictions in place when gathering anywhere outdoors, including in private gardens, public parks and beaches, outdoor areas of regulated premises or for outdoor activities and events. Please note, however, that regulated premises may have their own policies in place as reasonable measures, and you should abide by their policies.

Although you do not need to practice social distancing outdoors, you are still advised to make your own judgement and avoid crowds, queuing or large gatherings wherever possible.

It is generally safer to meet outdoors and for this reason, outdoor activity has been prioritised. The likelihood of COVID-19 transmission is substantially lower in the open air than indoors. This restores more freedom to people more quickly while minimising the risk of transmission.

Even as restrictions are lifted, it is essential that everyone carries on with the good habits that reduce transmission: socially distancing and wearing face coverings when required, remembering good hand hygiene and getting a test at the first sign of symptoms, staying at home if unwell, to reduce the risk.

The Test, Trace and Protect system will continue to support the easing of social and economic restrictions. It will also be important in identifying local outbreaks and Variants of Concern.

I don’t have access to my garden other than through my house, what do I do?

When meeting in private gardens, visitors can go through the house to reach the garden or outdoor space, but must not stay in the house unless they are part of the permitted group of six people from up to six households (not including children under 11 from these households or a carer of any person present) permitted under the current restrictions. If you can, you should also avoid touching things indoors, such as light switches and door handles. You should also ensure there is good ventilation by keeping open any doors and windows to permit air to flow.

Can visitors to my children’s garden party use the toilet in my house?

People may enter the house for the purpose of using the toilet, but should keep the amount of time indoors to a minimum. They should only be permitted to enter the house for this purpose one at a time (with a care giver, if assistance is required because of age or ability.

Householders should keep the toilet or bathroom window open and clean toilet and bathroom facilities thoroughly and regularly, preferably after each use. Children should be helped to use the toilet and wash their hands thoroughly (according to their age and abilities), and all adults, should wash their hands thoroughly before and after assisting children. Older children and young people should be reminded regularly of the importance of washing their hands thoroughly and often and not touching their face.

Can I plan a children’s party in a public space such as a park?

Yes, as from Saturday 17 July there are no longer any restrictions in place when gathering anywhere outdoors, including in private gardens, public parks and beaches, outdoor areas of regulated premises or for outdoor activities and events. Please note, however, that regulated premises may have their own policies in place as reasonable measures, and you should abide by their policies.

Although you do not need to practice social distancing outdoors, you are still advised to make your own judgement and avoid large gatherings wherever possible.

Is a children’s party an organised children’s activity?

No, an organised children’s activity, known as a regulated gathering for the development and wellbeing of children in the Health Protection (Coronavirus Restrictions) (No. 5) (Wales) Regulations), encompasses a broad range of activities attended by children and young people, held for their development and well-being, such as sports clubs, drama classes, parent and toddler groups, youth groups and religious groups. These activities are run by a business, a public body or charitable institution, a club, or the national governing body of a sport or other activity. 

Can I organise an end of term party or prom?

Yes, you can. The guidance to follow is dependent upon the premises the party is to be held at. See above guidance for organising a party in regulated premises and public spaces.

Are there any activities we can’t hold during the party?

Avoid activities that involve close face to face contact such as face painting, glitter tattoos etc. Also, consider if you are inviting any entertainers or additional adults to provide an activity then they will be included in the number of adults and households able to attend.

Can we provide food for those attending the party?

You should avoid sharing or using the same items as people outside your household, for example plates, cups and food packages. Any items that are passed between people in different households will increase the risk of the spread of the virus.