Skip to main content

The rules for gathering with other people at alert level 2.

Part of:
First published:
14 May 2021
Last updated:

Introduction

We are more likely to catch coronavirus from – and pass it on to – people we are in close contact with every day. The safest thing to do is to avoid contact with other people you do not live with. However, we recognise that this is difficult. This guidance outlines the rules in place for gathering with other people.

The general rules at alert level 2 are that:

  • Other than in limited circumstances, nobody other than members of your extended household should enter your home. Please refer to the visiting people in private homes below  for further information on this, including what is meant by an “extended household”. people can meet with people they do not live with outdoors (including in private gardens) as long as a maximum of six people from up to six households (not including carers or children under 11 from any of these households) meet at one time

But we are asking people to consider not just what they can do – what the law allows them to do – but what they should do – what is the right thing to do to minimise the spread of coronavirus.  In particular, we ask you to

  • please try and be restrained in how many different people you see. It is better to see the same five people regularly than to see lots of different people occasionally
  • please maintain social distancing, including outdoors
  • avoid doing activities that might increase the risk of transmission (for example shouting to be heard over loud music, or singing in close proximity)

If you have been advised to self-isolate

None of the information in this guidance applies to people who have been told to self-isolate by NHS Wales Test Trace Protect. You must not leave your home if you have been told to self-isolate by NHS Wales Test Trace Protect. Failure to self-isolate when told to do so can lead to you being issued a fixed penalty notice or criminal prosecution. For more details please see our guidance on self-isolation.

We also strongly advise you to self-isolate if you are notified through the NHS Covid-19 app that you should do so. However, there is no legal duty to do so because the privacy and anonymity protections on the app mean that it does not collect any personal details.

We also strongly advise you that if you have symptoms of COVID-19, however mild, you should follow the general self-isolation guidance and should arrange to have a test (although again this is not covered by the legal duty).

Staying safe when away from home

Coronavirus is spread by large droplets and aerosol transmission from breath. The risk is even greater when sneezing, coughing or talking loudly, from the mouth and nose. This means close contact with others, in particular face-to-face contact within 2 metres, is most likely to cause infection. The virus can live on some indoor surfaces for days and may be spread by people touching those surfaces, then touching their mouth or nose with unwashed hands. The virus is much less likely to be spread outside, although this depends in part on the weather conditions, and disperses more in well ventilated environments. The virus dies quickly in the summer sun but less so in colder conditions.

Before leaving your home you should plan how you will keep safe and minimise risk. Frequent handwashing and the use of hand sanitiser gel remains important, as do social distancing and refraining from touching your nose/mouth with unwashed hands. You should also be mindful of whether you will be indoors or outside.

Even outside there are still risks in places used by many people, or where they may congregate, such as public toilets – where many people may touch taps and flush handles, petrol pumps, pay and display machines, door handles, and cash machines.

Disinfectant gel dispensers may also transmit infection if many hands operate them, so should be operated with the wrist/forearm rather than fingers/palm of hand.

Visiting people who do not live in private homes

In general the law does not prevent visits to people who do not live in private homes. So for example, indoor visits to care homes, hospices and secure accommodation facilities for children are permitted under the law. This does not mean that any of these places are obligated to be open - individual settings will need to ensure they are able to support visits safely. We recommend checking with the relevant location for their specific visiting arrangements.

These visits will need to be in accordance with the rules put in place by the setting you are visiting.

When considering whether there is a need to visit someone outside your extended household, especially indoors, you should remember we all have a responsibility to recognise the risks the virus presents to ourselves, our families and friends and our wider communities.

People will need to make judgements for themselves about what is reasonable, in line with that overarching principle. Keep in mind that the purpose of the continuing restrictions is to prevent the spreading of the virus, including to those we care about.

Visiting private homes

Households and extended households

A household means a group of people living in the same home. A household can be one person living on their own, flatmates, or a family living in the same home. What’s important is that it’s always the same people and the same home.

People can form an extended household with one other household. This means that all the people in the two households join together to become in effect part of a single household. This will allow you to spend time with the people in that household in your home or their home and have physical contact. You can also stay in each other’s homes and in holiday accommodation together.

A third household can join an extended household in limited circumstances. The following households can join two other households to form an extended household:

  • a household with an adult living alone
  • a household with a single responsible adult
  • a household where you are 16 or 17 living alone or with others of the same age, with no adult

This was previously referred to as a support bubble. Support bubbles were allowed to help people who lived by themselves, or households with a single responsible adult or a child under one to meet indoors with one other household during alert level four lockdown.

If you were in a support bubble, you can still maintain that arrangement as an extended household. You may also be able to join with one more household as long as your extended household meets the rules described below. 

Benefits of being in an extended household

The people you choose to join with, in effect, become part of your household.

This means you can:

  • spend time with them indoors or outdoors
  • meet up together in groups of larger than six in some public outdoor spaces (not including outdoor spaces attached to regulated premises such as cafes, pubs and bars)
  • have physical contact with them – there is no need for social distancing with people in your extended household
  • stay in each other’s homes overnight or stay in self-contained accommodation together
  • provide or receive care or support for them, if you do not do so already
  • give unpaid carers a break from their caring responsibilities (for example, by looking after their children while they take some time off)

However, we continue to advise you to take special care around people who are at increased risk from the virus and above all, around people who are extremely vulnerable.

Rules on extended households

Because a household can vary in size, there is no limit on the number of people who can be in an extended household. But only two households can form part of the extended household and if a third household is to join, one of the households must meet the following criteria:

  • a household with an adult living alone
  • a household with a single responsible adult
  • a household where you are 16 or 17 living alone or with others of the same age, with no adult

The key rules for extended households are that:

  • no person can be part of more than one extended household, with the exception of people who live in two homes (for example children whose parents have separated and have joint custody or students with a term time and out of term home)
  • all individuals in one home must belong to the same extended household 
  • all of the adult members of each household must agree to join the same extended household

We recommend people avoid changing extended households unless absolutely necessary, in order to limit the spread of coronavirus between households.

However, we recognise that people’s relationships and circumstances may change over time. If necessary, those eligible can form a new extended household provided that:

  • both households end their current extended household.
  • both households refrain from mixing with any other household (including your new extended household) for a period of 10 days before forming the new extended household.

If someone in your previous extended household develops symptoms or tests positive for coronavirus up to 48 hours after members of the extended household last met, if told to do so by a contact tracer members of the extended household must self-isolate. You must not form a new extended household until you have completed your self-isolation.

Local areas and extended households

There are no rules specifying that your extended household has to be with someone in your local area, or within any set distance of your home. There are also no rules preventing extended households being formed with households outside Wales, and we recognise that these may in particular be the right answer for people living close to a border.

However, bearing in mind the overall objective of the restrictions is to reduce contact between people as much as possible, we do recommend that extended households are formed locally where possible.

Houses of multiple occupations (HMOs)

Houses of multiple occupation (HMOs) are made up of separate households within a shared building. If you live within a shared building you can be in an extended household with one other household from outside of the shared home.

If you share facilities such as bathrooms or kitchens with other people, you do not need to enter into an extended household with those people in order to be in the same room as them. However, as an absolute maximum you should do so in groups of up to 4 people at a time, not including any children aged under 11.

University students

Students who routinely spend time both away at university and at home are considered to have two households for the purposes of the coronavirus restrictions. However, students are advised to only move between their term-time and out-of-term time households when necessary, for example, for work or because of concerns about their wellbeing.

If you do chose to go home for a visit during term, you should try and behave as any other visitor, so stay outdoors, keep physical distance and not stay overnight if possible.

The term-time household can agree to form an extended household with another household. Forming an extended household may be more difficult in practice in some forms of student households because all of the students are one household and therefore the whole household must agree to this.

It is important for students to understand what form of household they live in, as this will affect what people they are allowed to see and in what locations. Please see our guidance for students for more information.

If you are a student who shares cooking, dining, bathroom or toilet facilities with other people, you should note that you do not need to enter into an extended household with those people in order to spend time with them. However, you can only do this in groups of up to four people at a time (not including any children aged under 11).

Children and parental responsibility

Where parental responsibility is shared, existing arrangements can continue and the child can move between both parents, and therefore between both parents’ households and any extended household. The child should be considered to be part of the household or extended household of the parent they are with at any particular time. In other words if either or both parents form an extended household with a household which does not include the other parent, the child could continue to move freely between the parents, and be part of both extended households (i.e. the child does not have to socially distance within the extended household, whichever parent they are with).

For children who do not live in the same household as their parents and have existing arrangements in place to visit and safely have contact, these arrangements can continue. This could include children in foster care, children’s homes and adoptive placements.

Extended households and self-isolation

All of the above rules are legal requirements, and by entering into an extended household which does not comply with these rules, or by acting as if you were in an extended household where you are not, you will be committing a criminal offence.

In addition, although this is not a matter of law, we ask that if one member of an extended household develops symptoms of coronavirus, the entire extended household should self-isolate, not just those living together. This will become a legal obligation if you are contacted by someone working for NHS Wales Test, Trace, Protect and told to self-isolate. Guidance is available about self-isolation and how to apply for a coronavirus test.

It is also useful for people to keep a record of who is in their extended household and their contact details, so contact tracers can get in touch with them quickly in the event that they need to.

How to choose who to go into an extended household with

Choosing which household to go join with to form an extended household is an important decision and for many people we know it may be a difficult one.

For example, parents with adult children who live separately may have to choose which child’s household to pair up with.

In some cases, you may find that a household you wish to join together with has already agreed to enter into an extended household with another household.

There is no right or wrong way to decide on who you should go into an extended household with. However, in other countries where this approach has been followed, studies have shown that people have found it helpful to ask themselves who is in the most need of support, rather than just trying to decide whose company they have most missed.

Everybody is entitled to be part of an extended household, including people who have been shielding because they are at high risk of developing serious illness if they are exposed to coronavirus.

On the other hand, the risk of catching coronavirus is still real, and it is inevitably increased to some degree by entering into an extended household. In particular, if you enter into an extended household with someone who comes into close contact with others in their work or with children who are attending a school or nursery, this will increase the level of risk to the extended household.

Schools, nurseries and employers are required to take all reasonable measures to reduce the risk of transmission. However, ultimately it is for people to decide on their own extended households.

Other reasons for entering private homes

There are only limited circumstances in which people other than members of your extended household can enter your home, or where you can enter somebody else’s. The key one is for reasons of care or compassionate support, both of which are discussed below.  Additionally, if you have someone working in your house (such as carrying out repairs or cleaning) that is allowed.

People working in your home

There are many circumstances in which people might need to access your home or garden to carry out work there. As in all other parts of life, just because something is permitted does not always mean it is the right thing to do. We ask you to think about what is the most sensible thing for you to do to protect your family, friends and your community, rather than thinking primarily about what you are allowed to do. Only through everybody trying their hardest to follow this general approach will we be able to continue to lift restrictions.

Where work does take place in private homes, it is important that this is managed in a safe way and both the worker and household members are well and have no symptoms of coronavirus. Like other businesses that you may use outside of your home, people working in your home must take all reasonable measures to prevent the spread of coronavirus and consider the guidance on working in other people’s homes.

We recommend that no work should be carried out in your home if you are isolating, unless it is to repair a fault which poses a direct risk to people’s safety – for example, emergency plumbing, or carry out an adaptation to allow that household to remain in their property. If attendance is unavoidable (because of an urgent or emergency situation), additional precautions should be taken to keep workers and householders completely separate from each other.  In these cases, Public Health Wales can provide advice to tradespeople and households. But no work should be carried out by a tradesperson who has coronavirus symptoms, however mild.

Caring for others

The other main exception to the general rule is that you can enter people’s homes, or let people into your home, to provide or receive care. This enables help to be provided to someone who needs it, such as an older person, a child or a vulnerable adult. This covers any form of care, provided by any person, to somebody who is vulnerable.

Whether somebody is “vulnerable” follows the ordinary sense of the word and includes older people, children and those who are ill. It is also reasonable to take food and other supplies to a vulnerable person.

Carers – whether they are care workers or unpaid carers – do not form part of your support bubble. However, they can continue to provide you with whatever support you need, and go anywhere with you if you need their support.

However, although caring for a vulnerable person is allowed, if somebody is considered to be at increased risk from the effects of coronavirus, or extremely vulnerable you should take this into account before going to see them. It is vital that the risk of spreading coronavirus is minimised in such situations.

Compassionate grounds

Even for non-carers, if there are compassionate reasons for visiting someone, you may still have a reasonable excuse to see people outside your extended household in their home.

You may have compassionate reasons for visiting someone where that person may be suffering from a physical or mental illness, is isolated, have suffered a bereavement or you may be concerned about their general wellbeing or welfare.

When considering whether there is a need to visit someone outside your extended household, especially indoors, you should remember we all have a responsibility to recognise the risks the virus presents to ourselves, our families and friends and our wider communities.

People will need to make judgements for themselves about what is reasonable, in line with that overarching principle. Keep in mind that the purpose of the continuing restrictions is to prevent the spreading of the virus, including to those we care about.

Other reasons for seeing people in private homes

Finally, there may be some other limited circumstances where you can enter people’s homes or let people in to your home. For example, you can do so:

  • to obtain or provide emergency or medical assistance
  • to meet a legal obligation
  • to avoid illness, injury or escape risk of harm

Meeting people away from home

You are allowed to meet other people outside of your home, subject to rules set out in this guidance.

Seeing people outdoors

While the risk of transmission is lower outdoors than indoors, social distancing is still important.

In general, we are asking you to think about what is the most sensible thing to do to protect yourself, your family, friends and your community, rather than thinking about what you are – legally - allowed to do. Only through everybody taking responsibility for their actions will we be able to avoid further lockdowns.

Small groups of people are allowed to meet outdoors, including for exercise or simply socially. However, the smaller the number of people who gather, the lower the risk. That means you can vary the people you meet, but we ask you to try and be restrained in how many different people you see. It is better to see the same one or two people regularly than to see lots of different people occasionally. The more people you come in to contact with, the greater the risk.

In most circumstances, the absolute maximum number of people not already living together who can gather outdoors is six from a maximum of six households. This does not include any carers or children aged under 11 from any of these households.

The rules on meeting people apply to children as well as adults. It is still not generally permitted for children to go into someone else’s home unless you have formed an extended household with them.

In circumstances where young children mix with others, it may not be practical to maintain 2 metre distancing (between children, or even between children and adults). This is in part because it is harder for younger children to understand the concept of physical distancing, and in part because appropriate support from carers will often require closer contact.

Children under 11 are not included in any legal limits on sizes of gatherings, because studies have found that young children are less likely to transmit the virus, whether to other children or to adults. The virus appears to take a milder course in children than in adults for most cases. This will also allow parents with larger numbers of children to meet with other adults more easily.

However, as young children can still transmit the virus, parents of young children should still exercise their good judgement, take care and encourage their children to follow hand hygiene measures and keep close contact to a minimum wherever possible. Even with children, it is safer to meet in smaller numbers, and to meet the same people regularly rather than a range of different people.

In other settings, the number of children who can gather together will be limited by the size of the setting and the need for a sufficient number of adults to be present to supervise.

You are also able to spend time outdoors with your extended household bubble, even if there are more than six of you. As long as you remain outdoors, the maximum number of six people gathering together does not apply when all the people gathered together are from the same household or extended household. So, for example, if a family of six was in an extended household with a family of two, the two entire families could meet outdoors together.

However, the maximum of six people who do not live together does still apply in any outdoor areas attached to shops, cafes, pubs and similar – for example it would apply in outdoor parts of a car dealership or garden centre, and in a beer garden.

Larger households

There are no restrictions on people from a single household spending time together outdoors or in regulated premises. This is irrespective of the size and composition of the household.  For example one large single household composed of seven adults and two children under 11 could go to a restaurant, café, bar or pub together as a group.

However, if some members of that household wish to meet up with other people they do not live with, including people in their extended household, that gathering outdoors in a regulated premise such as the outside space in a café should consist of no more than six people from up to six households at any one time (not including any carers or children under 11 from any of these households).   An extended household of over six people can however meet in public outdoor spaces, but not in regulated settings.

Restaurants, cafes and pubs

All hospitality, including cafes, restaurants, pubs and bars are allowed to open. There are no longer any limits to when alcoholic drinks can be sold and normal licencing laws now apply.

Venues are required to take all reasonable measures to minimise the risk of exposure to coronavirus. For example:

  • customers will be encouraged to pre-book with details of all members of the group.
  • contact details will be required for contact tracing purposes
  • entry to the premises will be controlled
  • licenced premises, such as pubs, will be providing table service only
  • all food and drink should be consumed at tables
  • physical distancing measures will be applied, such as tables being spaced out
  • face coverings must be worn other than when seated to eat or drink

When utilising outdoor spaces, hospitality venues are required to ensure that the use of physical coverings, awnings, gazebos, marquees and similar structures are implemented in a way that is aligned with current public health advice. Generally this means that structures with a roof or ceiling must be open-sided (at least 3 sides or more than 51% open).

You can visit outdoor and indoor spaces of hospitality venues such as cafés, restaurants, pubs and bars with your household or up to six people from up to six households (not including any children or carers from any of these households).

However, if you wanted to visit hospitality venues with people you do not live with, including people in your extended household, that gathering should contain no more than six people from up to six households at any one time (excluding any carers or children under 11 from any of these households).

Visitor attractions

All visitor attractions can now re-open, including funfairs, museums, galleries, historical monuments and parks.

Venues are required to take all reasonable measures to minimise the risk of exposure to coronavirus. For example:

  • customers will be encouraged to pre-book with details of all members of the group.
  • contact details will be required for contact tracing purposes
  • entry to the premises will be controlled
  • licenced premises, such as pubs, will be providing table service only
  • all food and drink should be consumed at tables
  • physical distancing measures will be applied, such as tables being spaced out
  • face coverings must be worn other than when seated to eat or drink

When utilising outdoor spaces, venues are required to ensure that the use of physical coverings, awnings, gazebos, marquees and similar structures are implemented in a way that is aligned with current public health advice. Generally this means that structures with a roof or ceiling must be open-sided (at least 3 sides or more than 51% open).

You can visit outdoor and indoor spaces of these attractions with your household or up to six people from up to six households (not including any children or carers from any of these households).

However, if you wanted to visit attractions with people you do not live with, including people in your extended household, that gathering should contain no more than six people from up to six households at any one time (excluding any carers or children under 11 from any of these households).

Organised activities

Organised activities encompass a broad range of activities that can be attended by people of any age. This includes activities such as team sports, exercise classes, meetings of religious groups and support groups. During these activities, up to 50 people of any age will be able to gather from a mix of households outdoors and up to 30 people from that mix of households will be able to gather indoors.. There are no limits to the number of children aged under 11 that can take part. Organised  activities do not include activities such as parties or wider social gatherings of families and friends beyond the arrangements for meeting other people. Organised outdoor activities must not take place in the gardens or grounds of private homes and alcohol must not be consumed as part of the activity.

An organised activity must be organised by a business, public body or a charitable, benevolent, educational or philanthropic institution, a club or political organisation, or the national governing body of a sport or other activity. The organiser of the activity must meet requirements in the Regulations to take all reasonable measures to minimise the risk of exposure to coronavirus and must carry out a risk assessment.

Organised activities for children

Organised activities for the development and well-being of children are permitted. These activities could include a range of clubs or classes attended by children under 18 (or by persons who were aged under 18 on 31 August 2020), such as sports clubs, parent and baby/toddler groups, youth groups and religious groups. It does not include activities such as children’s birthday parties or wider social gatherings of families and friends beyond the existing arrangements for meeting other people outlined in this guidance.

While these activities are not part of a child’s formal education, they may have some wider benefits related to learning and development. These activities are usually run by a business, a public body or charitable institution, a club, or the national governing body of a sport or other activity. 

The operators of these activities must take all reasonable measures to manage risk and maintain social distancing. There are currently no set limits on the numbers of children under 18 that can take part in these activities.  However, organisers should ensure they limit the number of places to that which can be safely accommodated in the space available.

Organisers should avoid running consecutive activities, and give time for all those participating in one session to have left the area before starting another. This is important to reduce levels of transmission. Organisers should remain present for the duration of the activity.

Many parents or guardians may want to stay in the area while their children are participating in these activities. Where this happens parents should not use this as an opportunity to gather or mix, and should continue to follow the rules on social distancing. Parents and organisers should also be mindful of the use of face coverings for those over 11. While it is not mandatory for face coverings to be worn outside, organisers should consider whether or not they should be used in spaces where it is difficult to maintain social distancing. 

For parent and baby/ toddler groups parents will need to be in attendance during the group session. Parents should not use this as an opportunity to gather or mix before or after the session, and should continue to follow the rules on social distancing.

Exercise and outdoor activity

You can exercise in public outdoor places with:

  • members of your household or extended household, or
  • a group of people as long as the total number of people exercising is no more than six from up to six households (excluding any carers or children under 11 from any of these households)
  • a group of up to 50 people as part of an organised outdoor activity

You can exercise in indoor public places with:

  • members of your household, or
  • a group of up to 30 people as part of an organised indoor activity

You should ensure that you maintain social distancing from the people you are exercising with if they are not in your household or extended household.

Children and young people aged under 18 (or persons who were aged under 18 on 31 August 2020) can take part in organised activities for the development and wellbeing of children, which could include organised sport activities. There are currently no set limits on the numbers of children that can take part in these organised activities. However, organisers should be mindful of the requirements around social distancing and ensure they limit the number of places to that which can be safely accommodated in the space available..

There are no legal restrictions on this, but to avoid increasing the burden on the NHS and the emergency services, we continue to advise people not to take unnecessary risks while exercising or taking part in any activity. For water sports, we advise people to consider the RNLI’s essential lifeguard and safety advice on water activities at the beach, on the coast or at sea.

Outdoor sport and leisure facilities such as parks, playgrounds, tennis courts, golf courses, outdoor swimming pools and bowling greens can open. Facilities that are mainly outdoors but have some shelter, for example, golf driving ranges, can also open.

Indoor sport facilities such as gyms, fitness facilities, leisure centres and swimming pools can also open.

Indoor recreation facilities, such as trampoline parks and indoor play centres can also open.

A full list of types of businesses required to close is available in our guidance on business closures.

People should ensure that they maintain social distancing and hand hygiene when visiting these facilities. The operators of these facilities must take all reasonable measures to manage risk and maintain physical distancing.

Shopping

All retail can open and close contact services can open.

People should ensure that they maintain social distancing and hand hygiene when visiting shops. Shops must take all reasonable measures to manage risk, including ensuring measures to maintain physical distancing are put in place.

There are no limits on how far you can travel to shop, but people are advised to avoid unnecessary travel and crowded spaces where possible, particularly indoors.

As with other indoor public places, you must not meet with people from outside your household for shopping unless you are accompanying a vulnerable person.

However, you are encouraged, wherever possible, to go to shops such as supermarkets on your own. This enables more people from different households to shop at the same time, whilst maintaining social distancing

Work

We are still encouraging people to work from home where possible. People who are not able to work from home, but are able to work safely in their workplaces, can do so, provided their workplace remains open. This include occupations like construction and manufacturing as well as public services that rely on face to face provision.

You can undertake voluntary work if you wish to do so, but again you should do so from home if reasonably practicable. 

Seeing other people

There are some limited circumstances where gathering with other people away from home outside of your household or extended household. These include:

  • for work purposes, if it is not reasonably practicable to do your work without gathering with other people
  • to visit health services, including veterinary services
  • to access education and childcare
  • to participate in elite sports
  • to access essential public services
  • to avoid injury or illness, or escape a risk of harm
  • to provide care for or to help a vulnerable person; this includes getting food or medicines for them
  • for voluntary or charitable purposes
  • to take part in organised activities
  • to attend court or meet other legal obligations,
  • to move home, view an unoccupied property or undertake other activities associated with moving home.
  • to attend a funeral if you are organising it, are invited by the person organising the funeral, or are the carer of a person attending the funeral
  • to attend marriage or civil partnership ceremonies, if invited
  • to take part in a wedding or civil partnership ceremony or wake; or
  • to attend a place of worship

Where you do gather with others for any of these purposes, it is very important you follow guidance on social distancing, cough and cold hygiene and follow the rules on face coverings in indoor public places. You should also continue to wash your hands frequently or use hand sanitiser gel. You should only attend if completely well, and if you have any symptoms of coronavirus, it would be advisable to remain at home. If you have been informed by NHS Wales Test Trace Protect that you have come in to close contact with someone who has had a positive test for coronavirus, you will be required by law to self-isolate. You must not leave your home unless there is an exceptional circumstance to permit this.

Specific guidance is available on workplaces and the responsibilities of employers and employees.

Travel

Travel within Wales

There are no travel restrictions in place within Wales. This means that you are allowed to travel anywhere within Wales for any purpose. This includes overnight stays in self-contained accommodation with members of your household or extended household.

Travel in to and out of Wales

There are no restrictions in place for travel into and out of Wales. People living in Wales do not need a reasonable excuse to travel outside of Wales, as long as they are travelling to a country within the UK or wider Common Travel Area (CTA). Likewise, people living elsewhere in the CTA can travel into Wales.  However, people will need to check the restrictions in place in the country they are travelling to or from as some countries within the CTA have travel restrictions in place that may prevent people travelling unless they have a reasonable excuse.

We are asking everyone to think carefully about the journeys they take and the people they meet. We should all think carefully about where we go and who we meet because the more places we go and the more people we meet, the greater the chances there are of catching coronavirus.

International travel will restart from Monday 17 May.  A traffic light system, aligned with England and Scotland, will be introduced, which will classify countries as green, amber and red. Different rules will apply for your return to Wales in terms of which category of country you have visited. 

Before you travel you must consult the requirements for visitors for the country you plan to travel to.  Restrictions may be in place, including proof of vaccination, tests, quarantine and reasons for entry. 

Similar arrangements apply in Scotland and Northern Ireland.