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Aims / Objectives

1. What is the aim of the CPH Project?

The project aims to simplify the CPH system, to introduce consistent movement reporting rules across all species, and reduce the administrative requirements for most farmers.

Rural Payments Wales (RPW) is also capturing and maintaining information relating to all land parcels which constitute a holding, which will significantly improve knowledge of those land parcels being used for livestock production, consequently improving the ability to respond quickly and effectively in a disease outbreak.

2. What are the main changes?

The main changes as a result of this project are:

  • The removal of all Sole Occupancy Authorities (SOA) and Interim Land Association Management (ILAM) agreements);
  • The introduction of a 10 mile distance rule for all livestock movements;
  • Introduction of a new process for registering Temporary Land Associations (TLA) and temporary CPHs (tCPH) (for a maximum of 364 days);

Keepers acquiring land for livestock on a permanent or temporary basis are required to notify RPW in advance of moving livestock onto the land in order for the CPH to be updated or for a new CPH/ tCPH to be allocated.

A new online system (Manage My CPH) is now available on the RPW Online platform to enable keepers to view and maintain the land included in their CPH, and create / close CPHs online.

3. Where will it apply?

The changes apply to all CPH’s in Wales.

County Parish Holding (CPH) Number

4. What is a CPH Number?

The CPH number is a unique geographic reference for a farm or group of land parcels. The CPH is made up of a nine-digit number (for example 12/345/0001). The first two digits relate to the County, the next three relate to the Parish and the last four identify the Holding.

The CPH number is the basis for all livestock movement reporting regimes in the UK. If keepers keep one or more of the following species, the place where they are kept must be registered as a holding with the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA):

  • Cattle (including bison and buffalo)
  • Deer
  • Sheep
  • Goats
  • Pigs
  • Poultry (over 50 birds).

5. What is a Customer Reference Number (CRN)?

A CRN is a unique business identifier allocated by RPW to customers. This begins with “A” followed by 7 digits.
6. What is a holding?

A holding is any establishment / structure, or in the case of free-range farming, any environment, in which animals are held, reared or handled on a permanent or temporary basis, except veterinary practices or clinics.

A holding may be a farm, or other premises such as a market, lairage, abattoir or showground. Some keepers may have more than one holding, and some may be used by more than one keeper. 7

7. What types of CPH are there now – will this change?

There are currently permanent and temporary CPH numbers, and that will not change. Temporary CPH numbers are used for land that is used on a temporary basis (i.e. up to a maximum of 364 days) where the tenant is not able to use the permanent CPH that covers the land.

Temporary CPHs are allocated from the 6000 range (i.e. xx/xxx/6xxx).

8. What is a Primary Production Location (PPL)?

The Primary Production Location (PPL) is the main location of the CPH reference, and should meet the following criteria (in order of priority):

  • The PPL is the location of the livestock buildings/ milking parlour / main handling facilities for animal health and welfare/ husbandry purposes. In the majority of cases this will be the same as the correspondence address.
  • If no building / housing is present (i.e. in the case of an extensive holding), the PPL would be the gathering location.
  • In the minority of cases, where the keeper occupies no enclosed land and holds common grazing rights only, the PPL is the correspondence address (Common land cannot be considered part of the PPL).
  • Location of the greatest proportion of owned land/long term let.

The PPL also includes all surrounding contiguous land held by the customer on a permanent basis.

9. Will keepers be allocated a new permanent CPH number when they transition to the new CPH rules?

In most cases, keepers will be able keep their existing permanent CPH number, however this is subject to the PPL being located in the correct parish.

If the PPL is located in a different parish to the existing CPH, a new CPH number will be allocated to ensure that the CPH number accurately reflects the location of the holding. RPW will arrange with APHA for existing herd /flock marks to be transferred to the new CPH number, and for BCMS to arrange an administrative move of any cattle to the correct CPH number on CTS.

Existing tCPHs and 3000 series (sheep and goat movements) are being cleansed and will be replaced by a new CPH number or converted to a permanent CPH number where appropriate.

10 Mile Rule

10. What is the 10 mile rule?

To harmonise the arrangements across all species, the Welsh Government is introducing a new 10 mile distance rule for all livestock species.

The 10 mile distance is measured from the external boundary of the PPL (see above), and replaces the 5 mile rule that previously applied to sheep and goat holdings.

Land parcels located within 10 miles of the PPL may be merged into one single CPH, and movement reporting would not be required between those land parcels. Merging non-contiguous land parcels (land parcels which do not share a boundary with the PPL) within 10 miles under one CPH number is not mandatory.

Land parcels that are further than 10 miles from the PPL must have a separate CPH number and movement reporting will be required. There are no exceptions to the 10 mile rule.

11. Why is the distance rule changing?

Currently, there are different rules between species (for example a 5 mile rule for sheep and goat holdings, but no specific distance criteria for cattle holdings). The new rule will harmonise the arrangements across all species.

12. How will it reduce the administrative requirements for keepers?

Under the new rules, livestock keepers must register all the land that is in their use for the purpose of keeping livestock, whether on a permanent or temporary basis, using Manage My CPH on RPWOnline.

Keepers will have the option of managing all the land they use within 10 miles of the Primary Production Location (PPL) (see question 8 for definition) under the same CPH number. Movements of animals between parcels of land under the same CPH number do not have to be reported, reducing the administrative requirement for livestock keepers.

The livestock sector will also benefit from consistent movement reporting rules across all species and better animal disease control capabilities which will result from these changes.

All SOAs and ILAMS have been successfully closed as part of the project. Many keepers will be eligible to merge all land parcels they currently use (on a permanent or temporary basis) into a single CPH. This will mean that they will not be required to report movements or observe standstills when moving livestock between land parcels registered under the same CPH number.

13. Is it voluntary?

Merging holdings within 10 miles is optional, however the withdrawal of SOAs and ILAMS, as well as the splitting of holdings over 10 miles is mandatory.

Keepers acquiring land for livestock on a permanent or temporary basis must notify RPW in advance of moving livestock onto the land in order for the CPH to be updated or for a new CPH/ tCPH to be allocated.

14. Will the changes affect a keeper’s flock / herd marks and tags they can use?

Yes, in certain circumstances.

Flock / herd marks are six-digit numbers unique to a keeper’s holding. They are also part of the ID number printed on ear tags.

If a keeper chooses to merge CPHs, they will not be able to use the ear tags associated with the CPHs that have been closed. Consequently, keepers should carefully consider the quantities of ear tags required and order the minimum necessary to avoid wastage and reduce unnecessary costs. 10

15. Is it possible to have two separate herd / flock numbers operating under the same holding number?

Yes. APHA are responsible for allocating herd / flock numbers, therefore keepers will need to contact APHA to discuss their requirements when their holding is transitioned to the new CPH rules.

16. Do keepers need to contact APHA / BCMS once they have transitioned a CPH to the new rules?

Customers who are creating new CPHs will continue to be required to contact APHA to register as a livestock keeper and to request a new herd/flock number for the CPH. Cattle keepers will also be required to register new CPHs with BCMS to ensure that the Cattle Tracing System (CTS) is up to date.

Permanent Land

17. How is ‘permanent’ land defined?

‘Permanent’ land is defined as land that is at a keeper’s uninterrupted disposal for 365 days or over.

(A single, or a number of consecutive short term letting arrangements (less than 12 months) does not constitute ‘permanent’).

18. How will holdings with permanent land be affected by the new rules?

a. Additional permanent land within 10 miles of the PPL

If a keeper has more than one permanent CPH with land parcels within 10 miles of the PPL, they may choose to merge that land into one CPH. 11

This would mean that the keeper would not be required to report movements or observe standstills when moving livestock between land parcels registered under the same CPH number. The introduction of a single CPH for land within 10 miles is not mandatory.

Keepers will also be able to request a new CPH number for land even if it is located within 10 miles of the primary CPH. Any livestock movements between different CPH numbers must be reported and standstill rules will apply.

b. Additional land over 10 miles from the PPL

If a keeper has permanent land which extends beyond 10 miles from the PPL, an additional CPH number will be required

If land is partially within 10 miles of the PPL, it may be merged with the CPH.

Rented / Temporary Land

19. How is temporary land defined?

Temporary land is land that is used by a keeper on a short term basis (364 days or less), e.g. summer grazing or winter tack.

20. What does a keeper have to do if they use land on a temporary (rather than permanent) basis?

If a livestock owner wishes to use land on a temporary basis for keeping livestock, they may be able to use the CPH number of whoever owns the land. If the landowner will not allow that, the livestock owner will be able to apply to RPW for either a temporary CPH (tCPH) or a Temporary Land Association (TLA). This is subject to meeting the sole occupancy criteria.

21. What is a temporary CPH (tCPH)?

A tCPH is allocated to land that is used for 364 days or less. They are necessary for livestock movement reporting purposes. tCPH numbers will be from the 6000 range (xx/xxx/6xxx).

All tCPHs will be limited to a maximum of 364 days. Welsh Government will write to keepers approximately 30 days before expiry. After this date, the tCPH must not be used for reporting livestock movements. Keepers will need to apply for a new tCPH number the following year.

Keepers must have sole occupancy and livestock cannot mix freely with other keepers’ livestock (this includes not being able to share the same housing or yard).

22. What happens to a landowner’s permanent CPH number when a land parcel is allocated a tCPH for another keeper?

The land parcels in question will be removed from the permanent CPH for the duration of the tenure and allocated a tCPH number. The landowner must not use those land parcels for the duration of the agreement, and there must be demonstrable separation from the remainder of the landowner’s activities.

The landowner will be able to continue using their remaining land parcels under their existing permanent CPH number. 13
23 Will landowners be notified when RPW allocate a tCPH (or TLA) for their land?

Yes. RPW will issue a letter to landowners to inform them when a temporary CPH or a temporary land association has been allocated to another keeper for land parcels from their permanent CPH. The letter provides the landowner with 14 days to dispute the allocation.

24. What is a Temporary Land Association (TLA)?

Keepers temporarily using land within 10 miles of their permanent CPH will have the option to ‘associate’ that land to it via a TLA, subject to meeting the sole occupancy criteria (please see below).

TLAs will last a maximum of 364 days (with an option to renew automatically each year), during which time they will be treated as part of the tenant’s permanent CPH for all livestock recording and reporting purposes.

25. What are the sole occupancy criteria?

In order to be considered to have sole occupancy, the following criteria must be met:

  • Premises owned or rented by an individual, partnership or company on which all the animals are under the sole control of the individual/partnership/company.
  • Individual fields or buildings that are owned must be under the sole management of the individual/partnership/company.
  • Individual fields or buildings that are rented must be under the sole management of the individual/partnership/company for the duration of the tenancy.
  • Fields or buildings (owned or rented) which are used by separate individuals, partnerships or companies, are considered to be under separate sole occupancies even if the individual fields, etc. were part of the same original CPH number.
  • Where another individual has a right of access through land owned or rented by the individual/partnership/company it cannot be accepted as sole occupancy unless the right of access will not be used at any time to move animals on foot.
  • Individual fields or buildings (owned or rented) must have separate access points to other fields or buildings not in the same sole occupancy.
  • A stock-proof boundary e.g. fence/ hedge/ wall, appropriate to the animals on that land, to keep animals under different sole occupancies separated.
  • Livestock cannot mix freely with other livestock from another CPH.

26. What is considered to be a stock-proof boundary?

Livestock keepers should ensure that boundaries between field parcels under separate sole occupancies are stock-proof and appropriate to the animals on the land. For example, temporary fencing / electric fences are not an acceptable stock proof boundary and do not meet the sole occupancy criteria.

27. If I rent a building located on a yard shared with other keepers, can I have a TLA / tCPH?

No, unless the sole occupancy criteria (above) have been met, keepers should report movements to the landowner’s permanent CPH (with their agreement).

Keepers should be aware that if they rent a shed that shares a yard with another keeper / landowner, this would not be considered to be sole occupancy, as the yard and buildings will be in the same land parcel. Sole occupancy can only be valid where the entire land parcel is only used by one keeper.

Keepers should be aware that any movements onto the landowner’s permanent CPH would trigger standstill for all keepers using the same CPH number. Similarly, any TB restrictions would also apply to all in the event of a TB reactor being disclosed. Keepers should carefully consider the implications of these restrictions on their business.

28. What if I do not hold any land on a permanent basis (landless keeper)?

Keepers with no permanent land are considered under the CPH project to be ‘landless’ keepers. In this scenario, the keeper will be able to assign their correspondence address as their PPL. The 10 mile radius would then be measured from that location, and a permanent CPH number allocated.
If the rented land is within 10 miles, the keeper will be able to associate the rented land to the permanent CPH number as a TLA (with the option of it being recurring each year). If the land is beyond 10 miles, they will require a tCPH.

Land Management

29. Why do keepers need to supply field parcel information when WG already have the information from the annual Single Application Form (SAF)?

The purpose of this exercise is to ensure the Welsh Government has up to date record of all land available to keepers for the purpose of keeping livestock. Although keepers may submit an annual Single Application Form (SAF), this form only provides a snap-shot of the available land on 15 May and does not account for changes throughout the year.

It therefore does not cover short-term lets which were not in place on 15 May, or land used under a grazing licence.

30. What if a keeper takes on new land or gives up a parcel of land, who do they inform?

Rural Payments Wales must be notified of any changes to the ownership / tenure of land within 30 days of the change, in line with field maintenance requirements.

If the land is being used for livestock purposes, RPW must also be informed of your use of the land in advance of animals being moved onto the land. Customers should use the Manage My CPH service on RPW Online for:

  • A new CPH request
  • Adding temporary land to a CPH via a TLA (within 10 miles)
  • Amendments to land included within a CPH (adding / removing)

31. What if more than one livestock business is operated from the same location (including livestock owned by other family members or livestock housed in the same shed but owned by different businesses)?

If livestock are not physically separate, both businesses should use the same permanent CPH number, and must observe the same movement reporting rules and standstill requirements.

If livestock are physically separate (i.e. using different land parcels) the businesses can be registered separately and each given a permanent CPH number. There will be a requirement to identify which parcels of land fall into which CPH and any movements between those CPHs will need to comply with movement reporting and standstill requirements.

A complex of buildings located within a PPL (for example buildings sharing the same yard) cannot be split, and can be assigned only to one CPH.

32. How will keepers be able to update their land parcel details in future?

The Welsh Government has developed an online system called Manage My CPH to enable customers to update the land details for their CPH. The online service was made available on RPW Online (www.gov.wales/rpwonline) from February 2018.

Manage My CPH enables customers to view the geographic extent of their holding and electronically notify RPW of:

  • A new CPH request
  • Inclusion of temporary land to a CPH via a TLA (within 10 miles)
  • Amendments to land included within a CPH (adding / removing)

To request access to RPW Online or if you have any queries on using the online system, please contact the RPW Customer Contact Centre on 0300 062 5004.

TB Restrictions / TB Testing Impacts

33. What impact will the CPH project have on a keeper’s TB status?

Holdings currently under bovine TB restrictions may not have the flexibility to split and/or merge CPHs in the first instance (until the holding becomes Officially TB Free (OTF)). In such situations, RPW will consult with APHA before any changes are applied to your holdings.

If keepers opt to merge holdings within 10 miles of the PPL, TB testing will be synchronised as far as possible across all land parcels included in the merge.

Where keepers either opt to split holdings or where holdings are split due to the 10 mile distance rule, TB testing and any breakdowns may be managed by APHA independently, unless there is an epidemiological link between the premises. In the event of a TB breakdown on a holding which has been split and has a separate CPH, APHA reserves the right to restrict any other CPH where there is an epidemiological link with the breakdown premises.

Where any holding is split and then run under two or more different CPH numbers, each new herd will initially inherit the same TB testing history.

Keepers should discuss any changes to their holding with their APHA case vet.

34. Will a CPH split result in additional TB tests?

If a new permanent CPH is allocated because a keeper has land over 10 miles from the PPL, or because the keeper has decided to have a new CPH within 10 miles, any additional CPH will have their own, independent TB testing programme. It is possible that this could be synchronised with the original main CPH.

Keepers will be required to comply with TB Pre-Movement Testing rules when moving cattle between different CPH numbers.

35. Will a CPH split be compulsory for TB restricted holdings with land over 10 miles?

Yes. The 10 mile rule will apply even if a holding is TB restricted. Keepers are advised to discuss the implications of this with their case vet. All premises will be restricted until all holdings have become Officially TB Free (OTF).

36. Can a new permanent CPH be created for land within 10 miles of the PPL if a holding is under TB restrictions?

This would be a matter for the APHA to consider, although it is likely that the request would be declined until the holding becomes Officially TB Free (OTF).

37. Can a keeper under TB restrictions merge temporary seasonal land (e.g. summer grazing / winter tack)?

a. Additional premises within 10 miles of PPL

This would need to be discussed with the APHA case vet by the keeper in advance of taking on additional land, however as a general rule, if the rented premises are already included within a TB restriction notice, then the land may be merged as a Temporary Land Association (TLA).

If the temporary land is not currently under TB restrictions, a site inspection may be required.

b. The additional premises are outside the 10 mile distance limit.

No merger can take place as a new tCPH would be required. If the additional premises were previously included on a TB2 restriction notice, a new TB testing programme would be created for the cattle at the tCPH, and testing is likely to be synchronised with the main herd.

38. What happens if TB restrictions are placed on my holding whilst I have an existing recurring TLA (rTLA) arrangement?

Keepers taking on temporary land either as a TLA/rTLA or a tCPH have a duty to ensure RPW and APHA are informed if they are under TB restriction or become subject to a TB restriction whilst an existing TLA/rTLA arrangement is in place, failure to do so is a breach of their duties under The Tuberculosis (Wales) Order 2010

39. Will keepers be able to synchronise TB testing intervals?

Where holdings with land within 10 miles of the PPL are merged, APHA will arrange for TB testing to be synchronised as far as possible across all land parcels included in the merge.

Where a keeper opts to split a holding or where holdings are split due to the 10 mile distance rule, TB testing and any breakdowns will be managed by APHA independently, unless there is an epidemiological link between the premises. In this case, TB breakdowns follow up testing is likely to be synchronised by APHA.

Six Day Standstill

40. What is the Six Day Standstill?

Standstill rules were first introduced following the 2001 foot and mouth disease outbreak. Prior to this, movements of livestock were considered to be responsible for significant spread of disease.

When cattle, sheep, goats or pigs are moved onto a holding a standstill period is triggered preventing any of those species moving off the holding, except direct to slaughter (other exemptions apply). The standstill period for cattle, sheep and goats is six days, the ‘Six Day Standstill’ (6DSS). Pigs moving onto a holding trigger a 20 day standstill on all pigs and a 6DSS on any cattle, sheep and goats on the holding.

Common Land

41. What will happen if a PPL is contiguous with common land (i.e. has a shared boundary with the common land)

It will be possible for keepers whose PPL is contiguous to common land to merge the common land into their CPH number. Keepers must have registered right of common. This replaces the previous arrangement where keepers registered common land links for contiguous common land. 20
Cattle movements to and from common land now require a valid Pre-Movement Test as the default position. Keepers who graze cattle on common land are required to contact APHA in advance of any movements to discuss the TB testing requirements.

42. Will keepers need to report movements of animals to and from contiguous common land which has been merged with the PPL CPH?

No. Livestock keepers will be able to move animals between land registered under the same CPH number without the need to report and record those movements.

43. What are the standstill requirements for movements to and from contiguous common land?

Animals returning from common land to the contiguous PPL will trigger a standstill on the CPH for movements to anywhere else other than back to the common land.

44. What would happen if TB restrictions were imposed on a CPH if it includes contiguous common land?

In the event of a TB Breakdown on any part of a merged holding, including contiguous common land, any movement restrictions and associated TB testing requirements will apply to all parcels of land within the CPH. APHA will instigate common land TB breakdown assessments as normal.
TB restrictions and additional testing in co-grazing cattle herds would also be instigated.

45. What will happen if a keeper has grazing rights for the common, but the common is not contiguous with the PPL?

If the common land is not contiguous with the PPL, it cannot be merged. The common land would therefore need a separate CPH, and a Pre-Movement test would be required prior to any livestock movements between the main CPH and the common land CPH.

Keepers will need to ensure that livestock movements to the common land CPH are reported and standstill rules will also apply.

If owned land that is contiguous with Common Land is separated from the PPL by a stream / lane, keepers should contact the RPW customer contact centre in the first instance for advice.

46. Will keepers need to report movements of sheep to and from non- contiguous common land?

Yes. Movements of sheep and goats to and from non-contiguous common land must be recorded in the flock record and reported via EIDCymru or a movement licence / document (AML1).

Sheep movements should be reported against the relevant sheep specific CPH (00/000/XXXX) for the common land. Keepers should send RPW an online message containing the details of the non-contiguous common.

47. Will keepers need to report movements of cattle to and from non- contiguous common land?

Yes. Movements of cattle to and from non-contiguous common land must be recorded in the holding register and reported to BCMS. Keepers grazing cattle on non-contiguous common land will require a Cattle Common CPH number to report those movements.

Keepers should send RPW an online message containing the details of the non-contiguous common so that a cattle common CPH can be allocated.

48. Will keepers need to comply with standstill requirements when moving animals from non-contiguous common land?

Animals returning from non contiguous common land to the PPL CPH will trigger a standstill on the PPL CPH for movements to anywhere else other than back to the common land.

49. What is happening to historic common land links?

Keepers with grazing rights for common land that is contiguous to their PPL are able to merge the common into their CPH as a result of the new CPH rules. This replaces the previous process where customers needed to apply for a common land link.

Historical common land links are being closed as customers are transitioned the new CPH rules. If common land is not contiguous to the PPL, livestock movements must be reported against the species specific common land CPH number.

50. What are the rules if common land is sole grazed and enclosed?

Sole grazed and enclosed common land within 10 miles of the PPL is eligible for merging with the holding, subject to the livestock keeper declaring that:

  • The section of common land is enclosed by a stock proof boundary which has been in place for 10 years or more, or there is a valid Section 38 (or equivalent) consent in place;
  • The enclosed common (or element of) has only one registered grazier or, where there is more than one grazier, the declaring keeper is the only grazier that has, or has attempted to, turn out animals on the enclosed section in the last 10 years;
  • The use of the enclosed section of common land remains subject to the number of registered rights on that section;
  • The remaining portion of the common outside the identified boundary must be capable of accommodating the remaining registered rights for the common as a whole, with specific reference to environmental damage from grazing;
  • The keeper will be responsible for notifying RPW of any changes in circumstances especially if another grazier turns out or attempts to turn out on the enclosed section;

Pre-Movement TB testing would not be required if the sole grazed common meets the above criteria.

The enclosed section will be treated as any other section of land within the CPH business rules for livestock movement reporting to include the definition of ‘sole occupancy’.

Recording and Reporting Movements

51. Will recording and reporting processes change for livestock keepers?

There will be no change to the processes for recording or reporting livestock movements. What will change is which moves require recording and reporting.

Where a keeper has merged holdings together they may wish to start a new holding register for the newly merged holding. Keepers will still need to keep their historic records for the required period (3 years for sheep and goats, 10 years for cattle).

Timescale

52. How will the changes be introduced?

The project was launched in September 2016 and all SOA’s and ILAMs have now been closed.

All new customers are required to map their land on Manage My CPH when they apply for a CPH.

Existing customers who are making changes to the land they use, e.g. adding a tCPH/TLA are required to map their holding on Manage My CPH. All remaining customers are now being gradually contacted by RPW and invited to log onto their RPW Online account to transition their own holding onto the new rules, and to maintain their CPH online.

53. Once a customer has been transitioned to the new CPH rules, is there any further action for the customer?

Yes – customers are required to keep their Manage My CPH record up to date, to ensure that all land used for livestock purposes is registered against a CPH number.

Delivery Partners

54. What is RPW’s role in this project?

RPW is the main delivery provider for this project. RPW is responsible for communicating the changes to customers and applying any changes to holdings as requested by customers.

55. What is APHA’s role in this project?

APHA is working with RPW to deliver these changes and will be responsible for updating TB testing records.

Holdings / Land Outside Wales

56. Is anything similar happening elsewhere in the UK?

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) is also undertaking a separate, but similar project in England, and communication with livestock keepers commenced in July 2016.

57. What if I have permanent or temporary land located in England?

English land located within 10 miles can be merged into a Welsh CPH (and vice versa) to form a single CPH for livestock movement and reporting purposes. Livestock movements within a single, merged CPH do not have to be recorded or reported. Temporary land in England can also be associated with a Welsh CPH via a TLA if within 10 miles.
58. How will a cross border holding affect my Basic Payment Scheme claim?

To claim Basic Payment Scheme and land based Rural Development Schemes, keepers with land in both countries will need to continue submitting a Single Application Form (SAF) to RPW for the Welsh land and the equivalent form to the

Rural Payments Agency (RPA) in England for the English land, regardless of whether there is a single CPH for livestock movement purposes.

Further Information

59. What information is available?

Further information on the CPH Project can be found on the Welsh Government website: http://gov.wales/cphproject

60. Where can I get further information?

Welsh Government
RPW Customer Contact Centre: 0300 062 5004
County Parish Holdings and livestock movements

Farm Liasion Service
farmliaisonservice@gov.wales

APHA
Customer registration team
0300 303 8268
apha.cymruwales@apha.gov.uk

BCMS
0345 050 3456
bcmsctsonline@rpa.gov.uk

EIDCymru
01970 636959
contact@eidcymru.org

BPEX
0844 335 8400

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