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What you and businesses can and cannot do during the outbreak and what happens if you break these new laws.

First published:
27 March 2020
Last updated:

This guidance is national guidance that applies across Wales. 

Please consider if local restrictions are in place when reading and implementing this guidance.

General

What restrictions are in place?

There are 5 main things:

  • people are not allowed to meet socially anywhere indoors with people they don’t live with. However, if you have formed an (exclusive) extended household, you can meet indoors in a group of up to six members of that extended household at any one time (under 11s are not included when counting the six as long as they are part of that extended household)
  • people must not gather outdoors in groups of more than 30.
  • face coverings are mandatory in indoor public spaces (subject to certain exemptions and exceptions)
  • licensed premises must not sell alcohol after 10pm
  • local restrictions are in place in some parts of Wales

Meeting people indoors

Who am I allowed to meet up with socially indoors?

You can only meet socially indoors with people who you live with (your household) and members of your extended household if you have formed one. As of 14 September, meetings or gatherings indoors even within your extended household must be limited to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11).

This applies in places like pubs and restaurants as well as in people’s homes.

What is an extended household?

Up to four households are able to join together to form an extended household. This means all the people living in these separate households become part of one extended household for the purposes of the coronavirus restrictions.

They will enjoy the same legal freedoms people living in individual households currently have – such as being able to meet indoors, have physical contact and stay in each other’s homes – other than that as of 14 September, meetings or gatherings indoors even within your extended household must be limited to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11). This applies in places like pubs and restaurants as well as in people’s homes.

Indoor gatherings are limited to six people – is that an absolute limit?

Children aged under 11 are not included – so a gathering could for example include four adults, two teenage children and any number of younger children under 11.

Carers – whether they are care workers or unpaid carers – do not form part of your extended household and do not count towards the limit of 6 people over 11 in a group. However, they can continue to provide you with whatever support you need, and go anywhere with you if you need their support.

Finally, there are slightly different rules for larger households that are themselves made up of more than 6 people aged 11 or over.

There are already over 6 people aged 11 or over in my household – are we exempt from the rule that only 6 people can gather together?

To a large extent, yes. Clearly, all members of the household need to be able to be at home together, and there is no public health benefit in preventing the members of a household from being able to go out places together. Therefore, a household of (say) 8 people aged 11 or over could go to a restaurant, café, bar or pub together as a group.

However, if some members of that household wish to meet up with other people in their extended household, each gathering should contain no more than 6 people aged 11 or over.

For example, if a family of 6 people all aged 11 or over were in an extended household arrangement with their neighbour who lived alone, and wanted to go out for a meal with the neighbour, only a maximum of five people from that family would be allowed to go.

I have a booking for more than six people – can it still go ahead?

Any group bookings that will not be permitted in future, including for travel, visitor attractions, restaurants or elsewhere, must be postponed or, where possible, proceed in line with new guidance (i.e. as a group of up to 6 people not including children under 11, and made up exclusively of people from your household or extended household).

What is the purpose of having an extended household?

The idea is to allow families or close friends who have been separated over these last few months to reconnect with each other and enjoy each other’s close company once again.

These extended household arrangements also support caring arrangements. In particular, they may help working parents with informal childcare, as more businesses reopen their doors and return to formalised working arrangements and they may help people with other caring responsibilities.

Is there a limit on the number of people who can be in an extended household?

No. There is no limit on the number of people who can be in an extended household, providing they all live in the households being joined together.

Up to four households are able to join together to form an extended household and only one extended household can be formed. This includes two existing extended households (of two households) joining together to make an extended household of four households.

However, as of 14 September, any one meeting or gathering indoors even within your extended household must be limited to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11). This applies in places like pubs and restaurants as well as in people’s homes.

These limits on the number of households and meeting sizes will help to prevent the virus spreading.

How do I choose which other household(s) to pair with?

Choosing which household(s) to go into an extended household with is an important decision, and for many people this may be a difficult one.

There is no right or wrong way to decide. However, in other countries where this approach has been followed, people have found it helpful to:

  • Think about who is in the most need of support, rather than just trying to decide whose company they have most missed.
  • Think about the risks – people who were previously shielding can form an extended household, but this will increase their risk of being exposed to coronavirus.
  • Think about the consequences – if anyone in the extended household develops symptoms of coronavirus, everyone will be asked to self-isolate at least until the outcome of a test is known. For some people this will have a greater consequence than for others, and needs to be thought about carefully.

What happens if I can’t agree with the people I live with about who we should pair up with?

Everyone living in the households which form the extended household must belong to the same extended household. So all the adults in all the households must agree to the decision to create the extended household.

Can I break up my existing extended household so I can join a different one?

No. Once you have agreed and formed an extended household with another household, you can’t switch to join together with someone else instead. This is to reduce the risk of spreading coronavirus.

Can I go into an extended household with a household in England?

Yes, but the arrangements will need to comply with the rules in both countries. The rules that apply in England are available here.

I live in a house of mixed occupancy – does everyone in the house need to agree to be part of the same extended household?

No, in circumstances like this you each form separate households. However where people have some private space but share facilities, such as bathrooms, living rooms or kitchens, coronavirus could spread throughout the house - and then ownwards again to your respective households.

So you should be aware that if you all form extended households you are putting yourselves (and others) at increased risk. Our advice is that you should think very carefully about forming an extended household in these circumstances.

What about people in assisted living?

If you do not live in a house of mixed occupancy then your assisted living arrangement is considered a single household, and each person within it cannot form their own extended households.

However, where care and support is needed, you are still entitled to have people visit you indoors to give that care and support. So, for example if you have a child with learning disabilities who lives in an assisted living arrangement, and who would normally return home on weekends as part of their routine to support their health and wellbeing, this could still take place. It does not need to involve the formation of an extended household.

I share parental responsibility for a child with someone I don’t live with – can they be treated as part of both extended households?

Where parental responsibility is shared, existing arrangements can continue and the child can move between both parents, and therefore between both parents’ households.

The change to regulations regarding extended households should not have an impact on this, and the child should be considered to be part of the household or extended household of the parent they are with at any particular time – in other words if either or both parents form an extended household with a household which does not include the other parent, the child could continue to move freely between the parents, and be part of both extended households (i.e. the child does not have to socially distance within the extended household, whichever parent they are with).

Seeing people outside your extended household

What are the  limits on who I can meet outdoors?

Gatherings of up to 30 people are now permitted outdoors. But you should continue to maintain physical and social distancing from people outside your household, or extended household if you have formed one (subject to what is said about young children below).

Do the rules on organised outdoor activities still apply?

Outdoor gatherings no longer need to be organised by a business, a public body or charitable institution, a club, or the national governing body of sport or other activity. Social distancing should still be maintained between people who are not part of the same household (or extended household).

However, we have provided guidance for organised outdoor activities, such as team sports, where it is not always possible to maintain physical distancing. The guidance makes clear that all reasonable measures must be taken to mitigate any risks, and activities are overseen by each sport’s national governing body.    

Those organising such events will generally hold a duty of care to those attending the gathering, which means they should ensure the event is as safe as possible.  We have also piloted some larger outdoor events for up to 100 people.

Are there circumstances in which gatherings of over 30 people are permitted?

There are some very limited circumstances where gatherings of over 30 people are permitted. For example, supervised recreation for children is a legitimate purpose for gatherings of more than 30 people. This includes childcare provision and summer camps. We have also piloted some larger outdoor events for up to 100 people.

Organising an unlicensed music event of more than 30 people is a specific criminal offence. These are events that are not licensed or otherwise authorised under the Licensing Act 2003. A breach of this prohibition will be an offence punishable by conviction and an unlimited fine or, as an alternative to conviction, by a fixed penalty set at £10,000.  

The unlimited fine or significant fixed penalty for organisers of these illegal events reflects the potentially serious public health consequences of people coming together in large numbers, dancing, shouting or singing over loud music and not social distancing. Someone infectious attending an event like this can easily spread the virus to others, who then take it back to their family and friends.

Can friends or family from another extended household come into my home?

Not generally, no, unless they are passing through to reach an outdoor area, or they have another legitimate purpose for being there such as providing care. The general rule is that you can only meet socially with people who are in your exclusive extended household indoors.

This is part of the reason why we increased the number of households who can join an extended household.

Why do the rules say meetings can be outdoors but not indoors?

We are learning more about the virus every day and we know the risk of transmission is lower outdoors than indoors – the virus survives for minutes outdoors but can live for hours on surfaces indoors. However, lower risk outdoors doesn’t mean no risk. It is still vital for us all to be physical distancing.

If I meet a person from another extended household in their garden can I use their toilet?

You should try not to – the more we go into other people’s homes and touch things, the more the risk of spreading and/or contracting the virus. If you have to use facilities in another household (outside your extended household), the toilet and hand basin should be cleaned thoroughly before and after use. Hands should be washed thoroughly after use and hand towels should not be shared.

I am not part of an extended household with someone but I think they still need my care or support – can I visit them?

You are allowed to provide care for or to help someone who needs it, such as an older person, a child or a vulnerable adult, even if they are not part of your extended household. This includes being indoors with them. You can also visit someone on compassionate grounds if necessary.

In particular, the law now makes clear that indoor visits to care homes are permitted, as are visits to hospices and to secure accommodation facilities for children (of which there is currently only one in Wales – Hillside Secure Centre in Neath). These visits will need to be in accordance with the rules put in place by the setting you are visiting.

When considering whether there is a need to visit someone outside your extended household, especially indoors, you should remember we all have a responsibility to recognise the risks the virus presents to ourselves, our families and friends and our wider communities.

People will need to make judgements for themselves about what is reasonable, in line with that overarching principle. Keep in mind that the purpose of the continuing restrictions is to prevent the spreading of the virus, including to those we care about.

What do you mean by compassionate grounds?

You may have compassionate reasons for visiting someone where that person is struggling with restrictions on meeting others generally or they may be suffering from a physical or mental illness, have suffered a bereavement or you may be concerned about their general wellbeing or welfare.

Other examples of things that may be permitted, include visits to people living or staying in supported living services, in children’s homes or young offender institutions. In each case, the service provider will need to put in place appropriate social distancing and safety measures before allowing visits, and you should contact them before travelling.

Are picnics and barbecues with people outside my extended household allowed?

Yes, if you remain outside. You should maintain physical distancing and should not share or use the same items as people outside your extended household, for example plates, cups and food packages. Any item that is passed between people in different extended households will increase the risk of the spread of the virus.

Now that many places have re-opened do we still have to physically distance?

Yes, every effort should still be made to keep socially distant, but as more and more aspects of daily life return to some degree of normality, in some situations this is impractical.

Now that gathering outdoors in groups of under 30 is allowed, there is no ban on playing sports. It is acknowledged that people playing basketball or football, for example, will inevitably not remain 2 metres apart continually during a game. We have provided guidance for organised outdoor activities, such as team sports, where it is not always possible to maintain physical distancing but all reasonable measures are taken to mitigate any risks (such as avoiding shaking hands or hugging as greetings or for goal celebrations).

A similar principle applies when going to a barber or hairdresser – it is clearly not possible to maintain social distance while having the haircut itself, but it is possible before and afterwards. Doing that reduces the risk of spreading the virus.

What about children?

In circumstances where young children mix with others, it may not be practical to attempt to maintain continual 2 metre distancing (between children, or even between children and adults). This is in part because it is harder for younger children to understand the concept of physical distancing, and in part because appropriate support from carers will often require closer contact.

For young children (those of primary school age or younger), it is in any case less essential to attempt to rigidly maintain continual 2 metre distance between them, or between the children and any adults outside their household or extended household. Studies have found that young children are less likely to transmit the virus, whether to other children or to adults, and the virus appears to take a milder course in children than in adults for most cases. 

However as young children can still transmit the virus, parents of young children should still exercise their good judgement and take care especially to encourage their children to follow hand hygiene measures and keep close contact to a minimum wherever possible.

Can children visit each other’s homes or meet together indoors?

Like adults, children can only meet socially indoors with people who they live with (their household) and members of their extended household if they are part of one. So it is still not generally permitted to go into someone else’s home unless you have formed an extended household with them. It is also not permitted to arrange for children to go somewhere indoors together, such as shops, cafes, cinemas or amusement arcades, unless they are part of the same household or extended household. Indoor children’s parties with people other than members of their household or extended household are therefore still not possible.

However, adults and children can now meet each other outdoors as part of gatherings of up to 30 people, and younger children do not need to rigidly follow the advice to stay 2 metres apart when doing so. So for example younger children can play together in a park or playground. Parents should encourage thorough hand washing before and after visits to the park and avoid eating/touching of face with unwashed hands. 

Face coverings

Where will face coverings be required?

Face coverings will be required in all indoor public places, for both customers and staff working in those indoor public areas. This includes a very wide range of locations, such as shops and shopping centres, places of worship, hairdressers and salons, cinemas and museums, gyms and leisure centres, and anywhere that is open to members of the public.

It would also include any public areas within buildings that are otherwise closed to the public – for example a reception area of an office building.

The only indoor public areas where face coverings will not be required are where you are inside a place to eat or drink, for example, cafés, restaurants and pubs.

Are face coverings required in schools and childcare settings?

Schools and childcare settings are not public places. The decision about whether to require face coverings in secondary schools and in what areas they are worn will be a local decision for the school or setting depending on their assessment of the risk and in context of local circumstances.

Do I have to wear a face covering if I am buying or collecting take away food?

Yes. In a place where food and drink is only being served for consumption in part of the premises – for example, a restaurant which also offers take away services or a café in a museum – you will need to wear a face covering in the parts of the premises where people are not eating or drinking.

Will I have to wear a face covering in my workplace?

If you work in an area open to the public, yes. If not, your employer should advise you.

Employers are expected to mandate the use of face coverings in other indoor workplaces where social distancing cannot be maintained, unless there are strong reasons not to. You may therefore find you are required to wear a face covering at work even in places which are not open to the public.

Who will the requirement apply to?

The requirement will apply to everyone aged 11 and over – including customers and staff. However, there are some limited exceptions which can be viewed in our guidance on face coverings.

If the requirement applies to me, will I have to keep my face covering on at all times?

In general, yes, but you may have a reasonable excuse to remove a face covering temporarily if (for example) you need to take medicines or you need to eat or drink. For more explanation of when this is permitted, please see our guidance on face coverings.

What is a “face covering” and how should it be worn?

To provide any protection to others, face coverings need to be made, worn, handled and disposed of in a certain way. The World Health Organisation recommends a minimum of three layers in a face covering.

Face coverings must cover the mouth and nose. When putting coverings on, and while they are on, you should only handle the straps, ties or clips. Do not touch the front of the face covering, or the part of the face covering that has been in contact with your mouth and nose. You should also wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water for 20 seconds or use hand sanitiser before and after removing.

Please see our guide to making a face covering which has three layers (as is recommended by the World Health Organisation).

How can I show that I am not required to wear a face covering?

Whether somebody has a reasonable excuse not to wear a face covering will not always be obvious. Disabilities and impairments are not always visible to others, including conditions such as autism and ADHD, and respect and understanding should be shown to those who have good reasons not to wear face coverings.

Some people may wish to carry information which demonstrates why they have a reasonable excuse (for example a prescription or evidence such as a hospital appointment letter relating to a medical condition). A number of organisations such as transport operators have created cards that can be downloaded from their websites and printed.

Visiting places

What kind of accommodation is open in Wales?

All accommodation can now open, but measures must be in place to protect people from coronavirus.

Will there be any restrictions in the types of service they are offering?

Most services will be operating as normal, although face coverings will be required in public areas.

Can hotel restaurants and bars now open?

Yes

Can I take my caravan/motorhome to stay in a caravan park?

Yes. Parks are able to open their toilet, shower, pot wash and laundry areas for caravanners and campers, subject to measures being in place to ensure physical distancing and appropriate cleaning.

Can I go camping?

Yes – campsites are able to open. The toilet/shower blocks, pot wash and laundry areas for campers will also be open subject to measures being in place to ensure physical distancing and appropriate cleaning (on GOV.UK).

Who can I go on holiday with?

You can currently go on holiday with the people you live with (members of your own household) or members of your extended household if you have agreed to form one. As of 14 September, the group travelling together must be limited to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11).

This helps to reduce the risk of coronavirus being transmitted. 

You should maintain social and physical distancing with people outside your own household/extended household.

What attractions will be open and what will still be closed?

All visitor attractions are now able to open. Measures to protect visitors, including social and physical distancing measures will be in place.

Can I go on holiday abroad?

Yes, but you should be aware that in returning to the UK you may be required to self-isolate for 14 days, if you have visited certain countries where this quarantine requirement is in force. Please read this guidance about who must self-isolate and what you must do.

Can I go on holiday in Wales?

There are some parts of Wales which are under local restrictions.

Travel into and out of these areas is only permitted by those with a “reasonable excuse” to do so – this includes going to work where you cannot work from home, or using public services that are not available locally.

Tourism is hugely important to Wales and there are no legal restrictions on people travelling to parts of Wales which are not under these local restrictions.

We are not telling people they shouldn’t come to these parts of Wales but we are asking people to think very carefully about making journeys. People should obviously not travel if they are unwell with symptoms of Coronavirus and it is really important to check for latest information about the area they are planning to travel to.

Restaurants, cafes, pubs and sale of alcohol

How are cafes, restaurants, pubs and bars be able to operate safely indoors?

The Welsh Government has adopted a phased approach to easing restrictions.  We have been able to closely monitor how hospitality businesses and their customers have adapted to social distancing and other mitigating measures in an outdoor setting.  We have seen a positive response to re-opening outdoor hospitality across Wales. Operators, staff and customers are generally observing the guidance and respecting social distancing and the other Covid-19 safety measures we have put in place. 

Taking full account of the lessons learned and the public health position, we have, therefore, been able to make a well informed judgement as to when indoor trading may re-commence as part of our established 21 day review cycle.

For those who have not yet visited hospitality premises since before the coronavirus outbreak, there will be some differences in the experience. For example:

  • most premises should be providing table service only
  • all premises selling alcohol must provide table service only
  • all alcohol sales must stop by 10pm
  • all food and drink should be consumed at tables
  • physical distancing measures will be applied, such as tables being spaced out,
  • you will be asked to give contact details for purposes of tracing people in the event of an outbreak being linked to the venue, and
  • there will be no live music and TV broadcasts will be kept at low volume

Who can I go to cafes, restaurants, pubs or bars with?

You are able to eat or drink outdoors with people outside your household or extended household, as long as you maintain physical distancing from them and the size of the group does not exceed 30 people.

Indoors, you are only able to eat or drink with the people you live with (members of your own household) or members of your extended household if you have agreed to form one. Even within your extended household, you can only eat or drink out as part of a group of up to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11).

Do I need to wear a face covering in cafes, restaurants, pubs or bars?

Yes. Face coverings are required in areas where you are not seated at a table.

Are there limits on when I can buy alcohol?

Yes. From Thursday 24th September at 6pm, hospitality businesses in Wales – such as pubs, cafes, restaurants, sports clubs and casinos – will have to stop selling alcohol at 10pm. Places selling alcohol to drink on the premises will also have to provide table service only.

All places licensed to sell alcohol for consumption on the premises will need to close by 10.20pm.

Premises not licensed to sell alcohol do not need to close by 10.20pm.

Off-licenses, including supermarkets, will have to stop selling alcohol at 10pm. This also applies to deliveries of alcohol, such as through a home delivery app.

Licensed premises and off-licenses cannot begin to sell alcohol again until 6am the next day.

Are there other venues which are required to stop selling alcohol at 10pm, other than pubs and bars?

Yes. The rule applies to restaurants and any other venues licensed to sell alcoholic drinks for consumption on their premises.

Do supermarkets and off licences have to stop selling alcoholic drinks after 10pm?

Yes. All off-licences, including supermarkets, will have to stop selling alcohol at 10pm.

Can I still get a drink in a restaurant after 10pm?

No – any restaurant which is licensed to sell alcoholic drinks will be required to stop selling alcohol at 10pm.

Can I still stand at the bar of a pub or bar and have a drink?

No. All hospitality businesses in Wales which sell alcohol – including pubs, cafes, restaurants and casinos – will have to provide table service only.

Will I be able to have a food delivery from a supermarket, including alcohol, delivered to my home after 10pm?

On-line deliveries from supermarkets and other providers will be permitted after 10pm but must not include alcohol.

Can I still order room service at a hotel after 10pm?

Yes, but you cannot be served alcohol.

Do businesses, such as coffee shops, that do not sell alcohol have to provide table service?

No.

Do buffet style restaurants have to provide table service?

No, but all drinks will be have to be served by table service. A member of staff should serve people at the buffet rather than customers helping themselves and touching the same utensils.

Do premises that sell alcohol at airports and ports have to close by 10.20pm?

No, they are allowed to stay open but no alcohol can be served between 10pm and 6am.

Do cinemas have to close by 10.20pm?

No, they can stay open if a screening starts before 10.20pm to allow for that screening to finish, but no alcohol can be served after 10pm.

My university/work canteen is licensed, does it have to provide table service now?

No, workplace canteens and canteens in educational establishment can still operate counter service (but they must continue to take all reasonable measures to minimise the risk of spreading coronavirus). If they are licensed, no alcohol can be served after 10pm.

Collecting contact information

What businesses are required to collect contact information from visitors?

Any businesses operating in high risk settings are required to collect contact information. High risk settings include where customers and visitors will spend a long time on the premises, and/or potentially come into close contact with people outside of their household (or extended household if they have formed one).

Examples of high risk settings that we would expect to collect and retain contact information include:

  • hospitality, including pubs, bars, restaurants and cafes
  • cinemas
  • close contact services including hairdressers, barbers, beauticians, tattooists, sports and massage therapists
  • swimming pools, indoor fitness studios, gyms, spas or other indoor leisure centres or facilities
  • bingo halls
  • casinos

Why are businesses being required to collect this information?

Collecting contact information helps to identify people who may have been exposed to the virus and are asymptomatic (i.e. are not yet displaying symptoms). Containing outbreaks is crucial to reducing the spread of coronavirus, protecting the NHS in Wales and saving lives. This will support the country in returning to, and maintaining, a more normal way of life.

What information will be collected from me?

The legal requirement is to the person’s name and information sufficient to enable the person to be contacted, to inform them that they may have been exposed to coronavirus at the premises (including a telephone number and the date and time at which the person was at the premises).

How do I know my personal data is safe and won’t be passed on without my wishes?

The General Data Protection Regulation places legal obligations on businesses handling your personal data, and guidance has also been provided to organisations collecting the data which draws on the work of the Information Commissioner’s Office.

For example, where the information would not otherwise have been collected and retained, your contact information must be securely disposed of or deleted after 21 days. Secure disposal means shredding paper documents instead of disposing in public bins, and ensuring permanent deletion of electronic files.

What happens if I don’t want to give my details?

If the venue you are trying to access is under a duty to collect your details and you are not willing to share them, you will not be allowed on the premises.

Entertainment

When will cinemas reopen?

Outdoor cinemas were able to open from 13 July and indoor cinemas from 27 July.

Cinemas should only open when operators are ready to do so and measures are in place to protect cinema-goers from the risk of contracting coronavirus. The UK Cinemas Association has provided industry guidance to support the safe reopening of cinemas. You will be expected to provide contact details.

As with other attractions, you will only be able to visit the cinema with the people you live with (members of your own household) or members of your extended household if you have agreed to form one. Even within your extended household, you can only visit as part of a group of up to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11).

When will museums, galleries and archive services reopen?

These venues are able to open but should only do so when operators are ready and measures are in place to protect staff and visitors from the risk of contracting coronavirus. Please check with your local venue to see when it will reopen.

We have published guidance for the phased re-opening of culture and heritage destinations, which includes guidance for the re-opening of museums, galleries and archive services. 

As with other attractions, you will only be able to visit these attractions with the people you live with (members of your own household) or members of your extended household if you have agreed to form one. Even within your extended household, you can only visit as part of a group of up to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11). You will also need to wear a face covering in indoor areas.

When will theatres or concert halls reopen?

Not yet. We have published guidance for the phased re-opening of culture and heritage destinations, which includes guidance for the re-opening of theatres and concert halls.

When will amusement arcades reopen?

These venues are able to open but should only do so when operators are ready and measures are in place to protect staff and visitors from the risk of contracting coronavirus.

As with other attractions, you will only be able to visit these attractions with the people you live with (members of your own household) or members of your extended household if you have agreed to form one. Even within your extended household, you can only visit as part of a group of up to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11). You will also need to wear a face covering in indoor areas.

When will casinos open?

These venues are able to open but should only do so when operators are ready and measures are in place to protect staff and visitors from the risk of contracting coronavirus.

The Betting and Gaming Council have produced industry guidance to support the reopening of casinos. This includes setting out requirements to ensure gaming floor layouts are arranged so as ensure social distancing can be maintained, ensuring hand sanitiser and face masks are available for customers and staff, and setting out cleaning requirements for the casino, including toilets.  You will be expected to provide contact details.  

As with other attractions, you will only be able to visit these attractions with the people you live with (members of your own household) or members of your extended household if you have agreed to form one. Even within your extended household, you can only visit as part of a group of up to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11).

Bowling alleys are allowed to open - what measures are in place to make them safe?

Guidance has been produced by the Tenpin Bowling Proprietors Association to support the safe reopening of bowling alleys. For example, you will only be able to bowl with members of your own household (or extended household) for now, in groups of up to six people (not including children aged under 11) and some lanes may be closed to ensure there is sufficient space between groups. You will also need to wear a face covering.

Bingo halls are allowed to open - what measures are in place to make them safe?

Member organisations in Wales will utilise the Bingo Association’s guidance on key principles for COVID secure operating guidance, which has been adapted for Wales. The guidance will go on the Association web site and copies will be sent to all operators in Wales, all of whom have signed up to use of the Guidance. You will be expected to provide contact details.

As with other attractions, you will only be able to visit these attractions with the people you live with (members of your own household) or members of your extended household if you have agreed to form one. Even within your extended household, you can only visit as part of a group of up to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11).

What measures are in place to ensure children’s indoor play areas are safe to open?

Indoor play areas are expected to ensure they operate safely and take all reasonable measures to minimise the risk of exposure to the virus. These include increased cleaning of equipment and a requirement to manage the numbers of people on site and the numbers of children using equipment at any one time.

The Welsh Government has advised that where equipment cannot be easily cleaned, such as in ball pits, that part of the centre should not be open for use by the public.

As with other attractions, you will only be able to visit these attractions with the people you live with (members of your own household) or members of your extended household if you have agreed to form one. Even within your extended household, you can only visit as part of a group of up to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11). Adults and children aged 11 or over will also need to wear a face covering.

What guidance has been provided to children’s indoor play areas?

The Welsh Government has published guidance. This includes increased cleaning and managing the numbers of people who come into contact – in particular adults and children older than primary school age. As well as play facilities some of these centres run other services including cafés, childcare and outdoor playgrounds. Guidance for all of these services is also available on the Welsh Government website.

When will skating rinks reopen?

It is planned that skating rinks may be allowed to open from 3 October, if conditions allow.

When will nightclubs reopen?

There are no proposals at the moment to reopen nightclubs, but we keep the Regulations under review.

Why are some venues being prioritised over others?

The coronavirus regulations are reviewed every 21 days, according to the law, to ensure the restrictions are in line with the risk coronavirus  poses to public health. We take this duty very seriously and people’s health is at the forefront of our considerations.

In reviewing the regulations, we draw on a lot of evidence about the virus in Wales, including the latest scientific and medical advice, international learning about the virus itself and evidence about its impact on public services, businesses, the economy and wider society in Wales.

We know that being indoors and in close contact with others, increases the risk of transmission. We have considered the evidence about how people use a venue, how venues are able to manage public safety and what we know about typical business models to prioritise what kind of venues should re-open first.

We will continue to closely monitor the impact of re-opening on transmission rates and continue with our careful, phased approach.

Travelling and public transport

Are there travel restrictions in place Wales?

There are some parts of Wales which are under local restrictions. Travel into and out of these areas is limited to essential travel only – this includes traveling into or out of the area for a holiday.

We are asking everyone to think carefully about the journeys they take and the people they meet. We should all think carefully about where we go and who we meet because the more places we go and the more people we meet, the greater the chances there are of catching coronavirus.

Where are face coverings required?

Wearing face coverings on public transport – including buses, trains, trams, taxis, boats and aeroplanes – is a legal requirement. Everyone aged 11 or over travelling on public transport needs to wear a face covering.

They are not compulsory in private vehicles such as your own car, or anywhere else outside a public transport vehicle (such as bus stops and railway stations) – but we are advising that you wear a face covering in confined or busy spaces where physical distancing is difficult.

Do I have to wear a face covering in train stations, at bus stops or anywhere else where I am not on board a vehicle?

As of 14 September, you are required to wear face coverings in the indoor parts of bus stations, train stations, airports and sea ports. You do not have to wear a face covering on an enclosed train platform or bus stop, but we advise you to do so if you are unable to maintain social distancing.

Do I need a covering if I am just stepping onto a vehicle, for example if I am just helping carry someone’s luggage onto a train?

The legal requirement applies to passengers only, but if the train is busy we advise you to wear a face covering if you are helping someone.

Do I have to wear face coverings in taxis?

Yes. This is to protect everyone in the taxi as you will all be in close proximity to each other for the duration of the journey.

Do I have to wear a face covering on a ferry?

In most cases, no. Face coverings on ferries are only required when you are in an area that is partly or wholly undercover, and 2 metre distancing cannot be maintained with people outside your household (or extended household if you have one).

But face coverings will be required on smaller boats where it is not possible to maintain 2 metre social distancing.

Are school transport / college buses running in September?

Please contact your individual school, college or local council to find out what school transport services are available in your area, and what the plans are for September.

Will my child need to wear a face covering on the dedicated school or college bus in September? 

Dedicated school transport is not covered by these rules, as it presents a lower risk of spreading the virus than transport that is open to the general public. A child or young person aged 11 or over who is travelling on ordinary public transport will need to wear a face covering.

Can I use public transport to take my children to school?

You can, but you should only do so if you have no other option. Trains and buses are currently running reduced services and there is less capacity due to physical distancing, so bear this in mind when planning your journey. 

Please consider walking or cycling where possible to help keep the limited space available on public transport for key workers who need to travel to and from work. 

If public transport is your only option, please make sure that you and your children follow the guidance on travelling by public transport to help us keep you, your fellow passengers and our staff as safe as possible.

Will my child need to wear a face covering on public transport?

Children must wear a face covering if they are 11 or over unless they have a reasonable excuse not to do so, such as a disability or suffering from breathing difficulties. More information on circumstances in which face coverings are not required is available at the “Reasonable Excuses” section of our guidance on face coverings on public transport.

Please make sure they’re wearing an appropriate sized face covering to make sure it provides the necessary protection. 

For hidden disabilities, the sunflower lanyard can also discreetly show people including staff and fellow passengers that additional help and support may be needed.

What kind of face covering do I have to wear?

We advise people to wear a face covering made up of three layers of a close knit, or close woven material such as cotton from a t-shirt or pillowcase. Read further guidance about face coverings, including about how to make your own.

Are there any other people who don’t have to wear face coverings?

Some people may have a reasonable excuse not to wear a face covering on public transport – for example if they have a medical reason or a disability, which means they are unable to put on, wear or remove a face covering. Read more guidance on people who may not have to wear face coverings.

Are there situations when I can temporarily remove my covering?

Yes, people may have a reasonable excuse to do this. Examples of these situations include:

  • To communicate with someone who has difficulty communicating, such as a lip reader;
  • In an emergency, for example to get someone’s attention;
  • To take medication if this can’t be avoided.

Read about the requirement to wear a face covering on public transport in Wales.

Can I remove my face covering to eat and drink?

You can do this if it is reasonable and if eating and drinking is allowed on the public transport you are taking. Examples of situations where this is likely to be allowed include if you are on a long journey or it is hot. Some people such as diabetics may also need to eat or drink more often. However, you should remove your face covering for as little time as possible.

Why don’t transport workers have to wear face coverings?

Transport workers do not normally have to remain in close proximity with the same people for significant periods of time, unlike passengers on many forms of transport. However, transport operators are required to take all reasonable measures to keep passengers and staff safe. This may mean providing screens, for example, between a bus driver and passengers but it could also mean transport workers wearing face coverings.

How will these new rules be enforced?

Drivers, guards and other operators of public transport may tell passengers not to board if they are not wearing a face covering. Ignoring an instruction like this is itself an offence. If necessary, the police can be involved, and passengers who don’t comply could be made to get off a vehicle.

Fixed penalty notices can also be issued, carrying a fine of £60 for a first offence; this is increased to £120 for a second offence and continues to double for repeated offences, up to a maximum of £1,920.

We hope people understand the severity of the situation we are facing and will comply with the regulations, without enforcement action being taken.

Can I car share or give someone a lift?

It is best to avoid sharing a car with another person outside your household (or extended household if you have one) if possible. If you do share a car, please stay as far apart as possible within the car and keep windows open. You can follow this guidance on travelling safely.

Can I now have driving lessons?

Yes. Following the suspension of the driving test and lessons in March, driving lessons resumed on Monday 27 July in Wales to give learners the chance to practise before the driving test restarts.

When do driving tests restart?

Driving tests have been available for critical workers only, and began again for everyone else from Monday 17 August.

Those learners whose tests were cancelled due to the pandemic are being invited to rebook a test first. Once this has been completed and we have tested critical workers DVSA will open the booking service to the general public.

DVSA is urging learners to speak to their instructor to make sure they are still well prepared and up to test standard before rebooking their driving test.

Safety measures have been put in place to protect learners and examiners from COVID-19 and DVSA has published information on gov.uk so candidates know what to expect.

Is General Aviation allowed?

Yes. You are now allowed to undertake General Aviation (GA) activities alone, with members of your household and/or members of one other household or your extended household if you have formed one.

There are parallels between the driving and flying environments for close proximity tutoring.  Therefore, it has been possible to undertake GA training flights since the lifting of restrictions around driving lessons, on the 27 July 2020.

Aerodromes are allowed to open provided they take all necessary measures to manage risk and follow the relevant guidance, such as how to take all reasonable measures to minimise the risk of exposure to coronavirus in the work place and premises open to the public, and physical distancing.

Other guidance may also be relevant.

Is Cardiff Airport still open?

Cardiff airport remains open, because it is a transport hub and it is a legitimate pass through location for people. However if someone is in a local lockdown a holiday is not a legitimate reason for travel, so holidaymakers from local lockdown areas should not be using the airport to fly. People travelling for work or those not in local lockdown or those with another legitimate reason for travel can continue to use the airport.

Shopping and food

What shops are open?

All retail shops can open, if they can comply with the physical distancing duty in Welsh law. People should avoid unnecessary travel and avoid crowded spaces, particularly indoors.

Can I now travel as far as I want to go to the shops?

Yes, but people are still advised to avoid unnecessary travel and avoid crowded spaces, particularly indoors.

Can I go shopping with my friends?

Meeting with people from outside your household or extended household for shopping is only allowed outdoors while maintaining physical distancing, as the risk of transmission of the virus is much greater indoors.

Indoor shopping should only be done alone or with people in your household or extended household (if you have formed one). Even within your extended household, you can only shop indoors as part of a group of up to 6 people (not including any children aged under 11). You will also need to wear a face covering.

What if I have been shielding, can I go to the shops?

Yes, the advice to shield has been paused so you no longer need to avoid all shops. However, you should still be very careful so should shop at quieter times, should make sure you maintain a 2m distance from others and wash your hands or use hand sanitiser regularly.

Close contact services

What guidance is in place for beauty salons?

Our guidance is kept under review and we recommend that the industry continues to refer to our website for the most recent version. We continue to work with the beauty industry to ensure the guidance is clear and reflects appropriate ways of working’

When providing close contact services it is generally not possible to maintain physical distancing. As a result most service providers will need to wear some form of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as a visor. You will also need to wear a face covering, and will be expected to provide contact details.

Are some things not allowed in beauty salons?

We expect all reasonable measures to be taken to minimise the risk of exposure to the virus. This means physical distancing and limiting face to face interaction, and improved hygiene (cleaning and sharing of equipment, hand washing and respiratory hygiene etc.)

There is strong public health advice against undertaking some form of treatments, because of the close facial contact required between client and practitioner. The areas in question are listed in the guidance - close contact services businesses. As a reasonable measure, we advise that they should not take place unless appropriate training has been undertaken and suitable protective equipment can be worn.

The guidance (close contact services businesses) has been updated to ensure businesses are fully aware of the safety measures required.

What guidance is in place for massage, acupuncture and electrolysis services?

As with beauty salons, we have worked with providers to provide clear guidance on appropriate ways of working. The guidance has been updated to ensure businesses are fully aware of the safety measures required. You will be expected to provide contact details.

What measures are in place to make it safe for massage, acupuncture and electrolysis services to reopen?

As with beauty salons, we have worked with providers to ensure there will be clear guidance on appropriate ways of working.

We strongly advise that treatments on the face do not take place at this time unless appropriate training has been undertaken and suitable protective equipment can be wornYou will be expected to provide contact details.

Can I have any of these treatments in my home?

Yes, but with the same limitations as above on the services they provide. People providing these services have been advised to speak to their clients before arrival to discuss the steps required to safely provide close contact services in the home.

Can I go for any of these treatments with my friends?

Other than taking children or accompanying a vulnerable adult, we would prefer customers attend their booking appointment on their own where possible to make it easier to maintain social distancing. Our guidance to businesses providing close contact services says that that when they take client bookings they should ask the client to attend for their appointment on their own. 

My hairdresser is open, can they now provide other services such as doing my nails?

Yes, it is now possible for salons to provide multiple types of services. But again we strongly advise that treatments on the face should not take place at this time.

Can spas open?

Spas were able to reopen from 27 July but only to provide beauty and wellbeing or holistic treatments. We strongly advise that treatments on the face are not provided at this time. From 10 August, Spas are now able to open their pools as well, but not saunas and steam rooms. Full advice is available in the section on leisure centres and swimming pools.

What guidance is in place for tattooists and body piercing services?

We have worked with the industry to ensure there will be clear guidance on appropriate ways of working.

Clearly, when providing close contact services it is generally not possible to maintain social distancing. As a result, service providers will need to wear personal protective equipment and you will need to wear a face covering. You will also be expected to provide contact details.

We are strongly advising against tattooing and tattoo removal on the face, and piercings on the tongue, mouth, lip, nose, brow or cheek.

Sport and outdoor activity

Can sport, leisure and recreation facilities remain open?

Yes, as long as they can maintain all the safety requirements to protect people from the risk of contracting coronavirus. Gyms and leisure centres have to put measures in place to ensure social distancing, good hygiene, the wearing of face coverings (where appropriate), and a gathering of people exercising or playing sport together must not exceed 30 people. They may also need to stop certain activities where people are in close contact because the risk of spreading the virus in the area is higher.   

Do the restrictions for indoor meetings of more than 6 people apply to sports facilities?

No.  Playing sport or exercising is a reasonable excuse to gather in a group of up to 30 people.

Are group exercise classes still allowed even with more than 6 people?

Yes. Exercise classes are able to run, but class sizes should be as kept as small as possible, having regard to the size of the room and 2m physical distancing. We expect all reasonable measures to be taken to minimise the risk of exposure to the virus. This means physical distancing and limiting face to face interaction, and improved hygiene (cleaning and sharing of equipment, hand washing and respiratory hygiene etc.) As a result some classes may not be able to resume at present.

Do I need to wear a face covering when I exercise in a leisure centre or gym?

As gyms and leisure centres are indoor public places, you will need to wear a face covering when you go there and you will need to keep it on depending on what you are doing. If you are preparing to exercise, changing or undertaking any activity that isn’t strenuous, especially when in close contact with other people, you will need to wear a face covering.

However, there may be circumstances where the layout of the premises and the nature of the exercise you are doing mean that it would not be reasonable to expect you to wear a face covering. The World Health Organisation advises against wearing a face covering when exercising as sweat can make a face covering become wet more quickly, making it difficult to breathe and promoting the growth of microorganisms. It advises the important preventive measure during exercise is to maintain physical distance from others.

As part of the measures the operator of the gym or leisure centre will need to put in place to minimise the risk of exposure to coronavirus, they will need to consider when wearing a face covering would not be appropriate and what mitigating action may be needed. They will be expected to give you further information about the systems put in place and what you will be expected to do.

Do both staff and the public have to wear coverings in a leisure centre or gym?

Yes. Staff working in areas of indoor premises which are open to the public are also required by law to wear face coverings while they are in those areas, subject to the same exceptions which apply to customers.

What measures are in place to make it safe for leisure centres and swimming pools to be open?

The Welsh Government published guidance to help facilities operators prepare for the safe management of indoor and outdoor facilities in June. Since then we have worked in partnership with Sport Wales, the Welsh Sport Association, governing bodies such as Swim Wales and the sector, to ensure that guidance will support the safe reopening of leisure facilities and swimming pools in Wales. Leisure operators have also agreed to share best practice and lessons learned with each other when they reopen, to benefit everyone who works in and attends their facilities.

All facilities eligible to re-open will have to ensure these guidelines are followed and must conduct risk assessments to ensure their facilities and the activities they offer are safe. We expect all reasonable measures to be taken to minimise the risk of exposure to the virus. This means physical distancing and limiting face to face interaction, and improved hygiene (cleaning and sharing of equipment, hand washing and respiratory hygiene etc.). As a result some training activities may not be able to resume at present and saunas and steam rooms should not open. You will be expected to provide contact details.

Supervised recreation for children and young people is now allowed – what does that mean?

The changes we have made are technical changes designed to clarify that supervised children’s activities, such as summer camps, are a legitimate purpose for gatherings of people from more than two extended households.

Who is allowed to supervise recreation?

Existing laws about who is entitled to supervise children are not affected by the coronavirus regulations.

How are playgrounds being kept safe?

Each owner or operator is required to take all reasonable measures to minimise the spread of coronavirus. We have provided guidance, which asks owners and operators to carry out a risk assessment and put in place practical measures to minimise the risk of coronavirus. Each owner or operator needs to apply this guidance to the facility they are responsible for, depending on the circumstances, layout and design. This will include taking account of the size, equipment and how the playground is organised, operated, and managed.

It is not possible to completely remove all risk. But the benefits of outdoor play to children are significant and the re-opening of parks supports children’s mental and physical health and wellbeing. Outdoor environments are lower risk in relation to coronavirus transmission.

Parents and guardians are encouraged to take responsibility for social distancing and hand and respiratory hygiene, for example by encouraging frequent handwashing or sanitisation, not eating or drinking in parks, wiping down equipment with their own wipes, and maintaining low numbers within parks and on equipment by taking turns or using parks at less busy times.

Moving home

Can I move home?

Yes. We recommend that if the property you are moving to has not been empty for at least three days that it is thoroughly cleaned before you enter it. More information is available at moving home during the coronavirus pandemic.

Are there any remaining restrictions on home viewings and other housing market transactions?

The restrictions on viewing occupied properties were lifted on Monday 27 July and prospective buyers and tenants can now make appropriate arrangements with landlords, agents or property owners to view properties. Everyone involved in the process should follow social distancing and handwashing and respiratory hygiene guidance.

Can a mortgage survey now be done at my property?

Yes. Estate agents, surveyors or removal workers are allowed into a property. They need to follow the physical distancing in the workplace guidance.

Places of worship, marriages and civil partnerships, cemeteries and funerals

What are the rules for religious services?

Places of worship can open for communal worship, although those responsible for the place of worship are under a duty to minimise the risk of exposure to coronavirus and to provide information to people who attend about how they can minimise the risk. Ceremonies can also be held either as part of communal worship or as events in their own right. People will be expected to observe physical distancing and good hand and respiratory hygiene.

If a place of worship is too small to safely admit a congregation, it might be able to arrange a larger gathering of up to 30 participants outdoors with appropriate measures in place.

Do I have to wear a face covering when attending a religious service?

Yes, places of worship are indoor public places and so the requirements will apply there as in other public place. We consider that those leading worship or a ceremony may have a reasonable excuse not to wear a face covering if they cannot effectively do so while wearing one, as long as they have taken other sufficient mitigations such as staying continually over 2 metres away from others and wearing a visor.

Are all potential wedding or civil partnership ceremony venues now open?

Yes, all premises that are licenced to conduct a solemnisation of marriage or the formation of civil partnerships can now open for wedding and civil partnership ceremonies. However this is subject to the need to take all reasonable measures to minimise the risk of spreading the virus on the premises.

Are there limits to the number of people who can attend ceremonies?

The number who will be able to attend a ceremony indoors will be limited by the capacity of the venue where it is being held, once physical distancing measures have been taken into account.   It is not affected by the general restriction on gatherings of above six people.  

To ensure that the maximum number that can attend is observed attendance must be by invitation only. Please see the relevant guidance on weddings and civil partnership ceremonies.

Are face coverings required in wedding and civil partnership ceremonies?

Guests will need to wear coverings, but given the importance to couples of the ceremony and the level of risk involved, we consider it is reasonable for the couple to remove their coverings for a kiss, for taking vows and for a “first dance”, as long as other measures are in place to protect people attending the ceremony from the risk of contracting coronavirus, for example, guests staying 2m away from the couple at all times.

What are the rules on holding receptions?

A reception for up to 30 people can take place outdoors or, where the wedding takes place on or after 22 August, indoors. Where the reception takes place indoors, it will need to take place in regulated premises (such as pubs, restaurants, hotels or community centres) and there are limits on the type of activity that can take place – for example loud music should not be played, and any food provided should be served at the table rather than at a buffet.

For more information, please see our guidance on holding wedding receptions.

A close family member has died and I need to organise the funeral – what do I do?

Funerals can be a distressing experience, and the impact of coronavirus is making it even more difficult to make practical arrangements. Guidance on funerals has been issued.

Can I go to a funeral?

Yes, but you must be invited. Numbers are constrained by the need to put physical distancing measures in place. Funerals are not covered by the general restriction on gatherings of above six people.  

Can I hold a wake or another form of gathering following a funeral?

A gathering of up to 30 people can take place for these purposes. If it is indoors, then the gathering will need to take place in regulated premises (such as funeral directors, pubs, restaurants, hotels or community centres) and there are limits on the type of activity that can take place – for example loud music should not be played, and any food provided should be served at the table rather than at a buffet.

More detail on what is permitted is included in our guidance on funerals.

Can I go to a cemetery to visit a family member’s grave?

Yes. But you should ensure that you follow physical distancing practices when doing so.

Obligations on businesses and owners of premises

The requirements for businesses to keep people 2 metres apart have been changed – what does this mean?

Businesses, and other premises open to the public, must continue to take all reasonable measures to keep people 2 metres apart whether on, or waiting to enter, premises, other than those who are in the same household or extended household.

However, as more types of businesses and premises reopen, we have introduced additional requirements that businesses must also take in order to minimise the risk of exposure to coronavirus.

These include maintaining hygiene standards and limiting close face-to-face interaction, wherever reasonable. We have also introduced a duty to provide information to those entering or working on premises about how to minimise exposure. 

These duties need to be met whether or not reasonable measures can be taken to ensure 2 metres distance between people. 

Where it is not reasonable for 2 metres to be kept, then anyone subject to the duty will be required to take other measures to minimise risk, which might include putting physical barriers in place or rearranging the layout and furniture to minimise close face-to-face contact. More guidance on measures that should be taken is available here.

Working from home is no longer a legal requirement – does that mean my employer can require me to go back to the office?

We continue to advise people to work from home unless there is a clear business need for them to return to a workplace setting. Employers are also under a duty to take all reasonable measures to minimise the spread of coronavirus, which will include ensuring they do not require staff to return to workplaces in the absence of a clearly demonstrated business need.

Enforcement and fines

Who enforces the restrictions?

The restrictions are being enforced by local authority environmental health officers and the police.

What can enforcement officers do?

They can issue fixed penalty notices or recommend prosecution in a magistrates’ court. In addition, they have wide-ranging powers to take practical steps to disperse gatherings, require people to go home and enter property.

What if reasonable measures to minimise the risk of exposure to coronavirus aren’t taken on premises or in the workplace?

Local authority enforcement officers are now able to issue a “premises improvement notice”.  This requires the person responsible for the premises to take specified measures, and if those measures are not taken an officer may issue a “premises closure notice” requiring the premises to close. Where necessary, an officer may also issue a premises closure notice without having previously issued a premises improvement notice.

So if people don’t comply premises can be closed down.

What will the police do?

The police in Wales will engage with people, explain what they need to do and encourage them to comply. But our police forces have been given powers and they will use them – the restrictions will be enforced if people don’t respond.

What are the financial penalties?

The coronavirus regulations include provisions for a fixed penalty notice to be issued for most types of breaches of the regulations, carrying a fine of £60; this is increased to £120 for a second offence and continues to double for repeated offences, up to a maximum of £1,920. If prosecuted, however, a court can impose any fine (it is not limited).

Organising an unlicensed music event of more than 30 people is a separate criminal offence. These are events that are not licensed or otherwise authorised under the Licensing Act 2003. A breach of this prohibition will be an offence punishable by conviction and an unlimited fine or, as an alternative to conviction, by a fixed penalty set at £10,000.  

The unlimited fine or significant fixed penalty for organisers of these illegal events reflects the potentially serious public health consequences at this time.

We hope people understand the severity of the situation we are facing and will comply with the regulations, without having to be issued penalties.

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