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The Commission on Justice in Wales will today visit the University of South Wales in Treforest

First published:
27 April 2018
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The Commission on Justice in Wales will today (Friday 27th April) visit the University of South Wales in Treforest to meet lawyers, police and probation officers and legal students as part of its work gathering evidence on what is working well in the justice system and what needs improving to provide better outcomes for the public.

Amongst the issues for discussion are access to legal services, diversity in the profession, ideas for reducing crime and the rehabilitation of offenders.

The Welsh Government set up the Commission on Justice in Wales in 2017 to review the operation of the legal and justice system in Wales and set a long term vision for the future. 

The work of the Commission, chaired by the former Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, Lord Thomas of Cwmgiedd and comprising prominent members of the justice and legal community in Wales is well underway. 

Since February the Commission has held events in Bangor, Wrexham and Aberystwyth, to hear the views of people working in, and affected by, the justice and legal system including prisoners and staff at Berwyn prison near Wrexham. Next month, the Commission will travel to Scotland to consider the experiences of our Scottish counterparts.

The Commission is seeking written evidence until early June before it moves onto oral evidence. The Commission for Wales wants to hear the opinions from as wide a range of people as possible about how the justice system can be improved.

The former Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, Lord Thomas of  Cwmgiedd said: “We are engaging widely with people and organisations across Wales to ensure that our findings and recommendations about the future of the justice and legal system are sound and enduring. 

We need to find ways to build on the existing good collaborative working between governments, the police, the prison and probation service, lawyers and the courts to reduce crime, promote rehabilitation and tackle the very serious problems facing people in rural and post-industrial areas accessing legal advice in their communities.  Our visit to the Rhondda Cynon Taf area on Friday will be another important step in this process.”

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