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The new Capped Points Score system (Capped 9) focuses on Year 11 pupil’s results from nine of the qualifications available in Wales.

First published:
30 June 2016
Last updated:

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The new Capped Points Score system (Capped 9) focuses on Year 11 pupil’s results from nine of the qualifications available in Wales. These are used to measure the performance of a school’s Key Stage 4 (GCSE and vocational equivalent) performance.

Teachers and others involved in the education sector have raised concerns with the Welsh Government that some of the changes to performance indicators resulting from the Review of Qualifications are having unintended consequences, including limiting the curriculum choices of pupils and giving a too narrow view of a school’s performance.

Kirsty Williams said:

“In 2014 my predecessor announced a series of changes to Key Stage 4 school performance measures resulting from the Review of Qualifications, including the introduction of a revised Capped Points Score.

“Since then we have begun work on a new curriculum for Wales and want to ensure that the recommendations from the Review are aligned with our current direction of travel.

“As these changes are being introduced, schools and the teaching profession have noted there has been unintended consequences, one of which is limiting what subjects pupils can choose to study, something none of us wants. They have also warned that it gives too narrow a view of a school’s performance.

“After listening to these concerns I have decided that we will no longer focus on the revised Capped Points Score as the headline indicator for school performance from 2017.

“Instead, it will be used as part of the whole range of measures that can be considered when evaluating the performance of pupils studying at Key Stage 4, but keeping a focus on attainment and helping schools and local authorities to evaluate their performance along this journey.

“I want to make sure Key Stage 4 performance measures are appropriate for our reformed curriculum and most importantly are effective in our aim of improving the results and outcomes for our pupils. Teachers and those in our schooling system have spoken, and I have listened and taken action in response to their concerns.”

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